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New smoke shells were fired when the creeping barrage paused beyond each objective, which helped to obscure the British infantry from artillery observers and German machine-gunners far back in the German defensive zone who fired through the British artillery barrages. Around Langemarck, the British infantry formed up close the German positions, too near for the German artillery to fire on for fear of hitting their infantry, although British troops further back at the Steenbeek were severely bombarded. British platoons and sections were allotted objectives and engineers accompanied troops to bridge obstacles and attack strong points. In the 20th Division, each company was reduced to three platoons, two to advance using infiltration tactics and one to mop up areas where the forward platoons had by-passed resistance by attacking from the flanks and from behind. In the II and XIX Corps areas, the foremost infantry had been isolated by German artillery and then driven back by counter-attacks. On 17 August, Gough ordered that the capture of the remainder of their objectives of 16 August would be completed on 25 August. Apart from small areas on the left of the 56th Division (Major-General F. A. Dudgeon), the flanks of the 8th Division and right of the 16th Division, the British had been forced back to their start line by German machine-gun fire from the flanks and infantry counter-attacks supported by plentiful artillery. Attempts by the German infantry to advance further were stopped by British artillery-fire, which inflicted many losses. Dudgeon reported that there had been a lack of time to prepare the attack and study the ground, since the 167th Brigade had relieved part of the 25th Division after it had only been in the line for 24 hours; neither unit had sufficient time to make preparations for the attack. Dudgeon also reported that no tracks had been laid beyond Château Wood, that the wet ground had slowed the delivery of supplies to the front line and obstructed the advance beyond it. Pillboxes had caused more delays and subjected the attacking troops to frequent enfilade fire.

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>New smoke shells were fired when the creeping barrage paused beyond each objective, which helped to obscure the British infantry from artillery observers and German machine-gunners far back in the German defensive zone who fired through the British artillery barrages. Around Langemarck, the British infantry formed up close the German positions, too near for the German artillery to fire on for fear of hitting their infantry, although British troops further back at the Steenbeek were severely bombarded. ⇒纏いつく集中砲火がそれそれの標的を超えて休止した時、新しい煙幕弾が発射されて、ドイツ軍砲兵隊の観察や防御地帯奥の機関銃射撃から英国軍の歩兵隊を覆い隠すのに役立った。そのドイツ軍守備隊は、英国軍の集中砲火の間を通じて砲火を行っていた。ランゲマルクの周辺では、英国軍の歩兵がドイツ軍陣地の近くで隊を組んでいたが、あまり近かったので、ドイツ軍の砲兵隊としては砲火が自軍の歩兵隊に当たることを恐れた。ただし英国の軍隊はシュテーンベークのずっと後ろでは厳しく砲撃された。 >British platoons and sections were allotted objectives and engineers accompanied troops to bridge obstacles and attack strong points. In the 20th Division, each company was reduced to three platoons, two to advance using infiltration tactics and one to mop up areas where the forward platoons had by-passed resistance by attacking from the flanks and from behind. ⇒英国軍は小隊や分隊に標的を割り当てて、障害を乗り越え、強化地点を攻撃するために工兵隊がそれに随伴していた。第20師団では、個々の中隊を3個小隊に小分けし、2個小隊が潜入戦術を使って進軍し、その先発隊が通過した抵抗隊を(残りの)1個小隊が一掃することとした。 >In the II and XIX Corps areas, the foremost infantry had been isolated by German artillery and then driven back by counter-attacks. On 17 August, Gough ordered that the capture of the remainder of their objectives of 16 August would be completed on 25 August. Apart from small areas on the left of the 56th Division (Major-General F. A. Dudgeon), the flanks of the 8th Division and right of the 16th Division, the British had been forced back to their start line by German machine-gun fire from the flanks and infantry counter-attacks supported by plentiful artillery. ⇒第II、第XIX軍団地域では、最前衛の歩兵連帯がドイツ軍の反撃によって孤立させられ、それから押し戻された。8月17日、ゴフは8月16日の標的の生き残り兵の攻略を8月25日に完了するように命じた。第56師団(F. A.ダジョン少将)の左翼の小地域、第8師団の両側面、および第16師団の右側面は別として、英国軍は、ドイツ軍の側面からの機銃掃射火と豊富な大砲によって支援を受けた歩兵隊の反撃によって強制的に開始戦線に押し戻された。 >Attempts by the German infantry to advance further were stopped by British artillery-fire, which inflicted many losses. Dudgeon reported that there had been a lack of time to prepare the attack and study the ground, since the 167th Brigade had relieved part of the 25th Division after it had only been in the line for 24 hours; neither unit had sufficient time to make preparations for the attack. Dudgeon also reported that no tracks had been laid beyond Château Wood, that the wet ground had slowed the delivery of supplies to the front line and obstructed the advance beyond it. Pillboxes had caused more delays and subjected the attacking troops to frequent enfilade fire. ⇒さらに先へ進軍しようというドイツ軍歩兵連隊による試みは、英国軍の砲火によって食い止められ、彼らは多くの損失を受けた。ダジョンは、報告した。第25師団が戦線について24時間もしないうちに、第167旅団が部分救援しなければならなかったので、攻撃の準備や地面調査の時間が不足した、と。彼はこうも報告した。すなわち、シャトー・ウッドを越えた先へトラックは全然入れないので、湿った地面のせいで前線への供給品配達が遅れ、それ以遠への進軍が阻止された。ピルボックス(からの攻撃)でさらなる遅延が引き起こされ、攻撃軍は頻繁な縦射火に晒された、と。

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