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The attacking troops were subjected to more German artillery fire than in recent battles, due to the reduced amount of counter-battery fire from the British artillery and inadequate air observation, during the poor weather from 4–8 October. It places the rain had helped mask the advance but when it stopped, German machine-gunners and field artillery could see British and Australian infantry and inflicted many casualties. Many wounded soldiers were left stranded on the battlefield, under sniper fire in the mud and rain. The battle was also costly for the Germans and Crown Prince Rupprecht wrote of the "oppressive superiority" of the British artillery, even though the 4th Army had fired 27 trainloads of ammunition during the attack. Units had become mixed up, suffered "very high wastage" and "confusion reigns". Rupprecht and Kuhl feared that ground would have to be conceded, to delay the British by making them redeploy their artillery. In the north near Houthoulst Forest, the attack had forced back the German line up to 2,500 yd (2,300 m) and 2,100 German soldiers had been taken prisoner. The strain was reflected in a 4th Army order of General Sixt von Armin on 11 October, acknowledging that although fresh ground holding divisions had defeated attacks, some British troops had advanced a considerable distance, with the result that ground was lost, despite the intervention of Eingreifdivisionen. Armin noted that more German troops were trickling to the rear, even on quiet days and ordered that "the sternest measures" should be taken against them and be made public. Despite the difficulties and the cost, the German defenders had obtained a considerable defensive success but with the attack on 12 October (the First Battle of Passchendaele), the Battle of Poelcappelle caused a "crisis in command". German losses had risen to 159,000 men, which jeopardised the front and "mentally shocked" the survivors. With operations pending in Italy and an offensive expected from the French on the Aisne front, fresh divisions were not available for the 4th Army. The 7th Division had 3,877 casualties from 1–10 October. The Official Historian noted 6,957 casualties in the 66th, 49th and 2nd Australian divisions and 10,973 casualties in the Fifth Army from 9–14 October, which included the First Battle of Passchendaele on 12 October.

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>The attacking troops were subjected to more German artillery fire than in recent battles, due to the reduced amount of counter-battery fire from the British artillery and inadequate air observation, during the poor weather from 4–8 October. It places the rain had helped mask the advance but when it stopped, German machine-gunners and field artillery could see British and Australian infantry and inflicted many casualties. Many wounded soldiers were left stranded on the battlefield, under sniper fire in the mud and rain. ⇒10月4日-8日の芳しからざる天候の間に、英国軍砲兵隊からの空中観察が不十分で反撃砲火の量が減ったため、攻撃軍は、直近の戦いにはなかったほどの大規模なドイツ軍の大砲火に晒された。雨が降るとそれが進軍の隠れ蓑になったが、雨があがるとドイツ軍の機関銃砲手や野戦砲兵隊が英国軍およびオーストラリア軍の歩兵隊を目撃できたので、多くの死傷者数を与えた。多数の負傷兵が、泥と雨の中で狙撃兵の砲火に晒される戦場に取り残されたままにされた。 >The battle was also costly for the Germans and Crown Prince Rupprecht wrote of the "oppressive superiority" of the British artillery, even though the 4th Army had fired 27 trainloads of ammunition during the attack. Units had become mixed up, suffered "very high wastage" and "confusion reigns". Rupprecht and Kuhl feared that ground would have to be conceded, to delay the British by making them redeploy their artillery. In the north near Houthoulst Forest, the attack had forced back the German line up to 2,500 yd (2,300 m) and 2,100 German soldiers had been taken prisoner. ⇒この戦いはまた、ドイツ軍にとっても高くついて、皇太子ルプレヒトは、第4方面軍が攻撃の間に弾薬積載の列車を27回も砲火したものの、それでも英国軍の大砲は「圧倒的な優越」であった、と書いた。諸部隊が混ざり合い、「極めて高い消耗」と「混乱の支配」を被った。ルプレヒトとクールは、砲兵隊を配置転換させることで英国軍を遅らせるために、地面を譲り渡さなければならないことを恐れた。北のフーツールスト森林近くでは、攻撃によりドイツ軍の戦線は最高2,500ヤード(2,300m)まで後退を強制されて、2,100人のドイツ軍兵士が囚人として捕縛された。 >The strain was reflected in a 4th Army order of General Sixt von Armin on 11 October, acknowledging that although fresh ground holding divisions had defeated attacks, some British troops had advanced a considerable distance, with the result that ground was lost, despite the intervention of Eingreifdivisionen. ⇒緊張状態が、10月11日にジクスト・フォン・アーミン将軍の第4方面軍への命令に反映された。活気のある地面保持師団が攻撃隊を破ったけれども、英国軍の数個軍隊が、アイングリーフ師団の介入にもかかわらず、かなりの距離を進軍して、その結果地面が失われたと認めたからであった。 >Armin noted that more German troops were trickling to the rear, even on quiet days and ordered that "the sternest measures" should be taken against them and be made public. Despite the difficulties and the cost, the German defenders had obtained a considerable defensive success but with the attack on 12 October (the First Battle of Passchendaele), the Battle of Poelcappelle caused a "crisis in command". ⇒アーミンは、静かな日にさえ、より多くのドイツ軍隊が後衛部に落ち込んでいくことに気づいて、その連中に「最も厳格な手段」を講じて、公表されることも辞さないよう軍隊に命じた。困難と高コストにもかかわらず、ドイツ軍守備隊は防御にかなりの成功を収めた。しかし、10月12日(第1次パッシェンデールの戦い)での攻撃では、「ポエルカッペルの戦い」によって「指揮における危機」が引き起こされた。 >German losses had risen to 159,000 men, which jeopardised the front and "mentally shocked" the survivors. With operations pending in Italy and an offensive expected from the French on the Aisne front, fresh divisions were not available for the 4th Army. The 7th Division had 3,877 casualties from 1–10 October. The Official Historian noted 6,957 casualties in the 66th, 49th and 2nd Australian divisions and 10,973 casualties in the Fifth Army from 9–14 October, which included the First Battle of Passchendaele on 12 October. ⇒ドイツの損失は159,000人に上り、その兵士らが前線を危険に晒し、生存兵に「精神的ショックを引き起こした」。イタリアで保留されている作戦行動隊とエーヌ前線のフランス軍からは、予期された攻撃のために活気のある師団を第4方面軍で利用することは不可能であった。第7師団は、10月1日-10日で3,877人の死傷者数を被った。公報史家は、第66、第49、第2オーストラリア師団の死傷者数を6,957人とし、10月9日-14日の第5方面軍の死傷者数を、10月12日の「第1次パッシェンデールの戦い」を含めて、10,973人と記した。

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