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On the night of 16/17 August, French airmen set fire to the railway station at Kortemarck, 9.3 mi (15 km) east of Dixmude. On 17 August, French heavy howitzers battered Les Lilas and Mondovi blockhouses all day and by nightfall both strong points had been breached and the garrisons taken prisoner. The total of prisoners taken since 16 August, exceeded 400 and fifteen guns had also been captured. From the southern edge of the inundations and swamps, between Dixmude and Drie Grachten, the French line had been pushed forward to the west bank of the Steenbeek, as far as the south end of St. Janshoek. South of Mondovi blockhouse, the Steenbeek had been crossed and on the extreme right, the First Army had swung northwards to the south bank of the Broombeek, which eliminated the possibility of the British Fifth Army being outflanked from the north. French engineers had worked in swamps and morasses to repair roads, bridge streams and build wire entanglements despite constant German artillery fire. The advance was made west of the northern stretch of the Wilhelm (third) line. Air operations Mist and cloud made air observation difficult on the morning of 16 August, until a wind began later in the day, although this blew the smoke of battle over the German lines, obscuring German troop movements. Corps squadrons were expected to provide artillery co-operation, contact and counter-attack patrols but low cloud, mist and smoke that morning resulted in most German counter-attack formations moving unnoticed. Flash-spotting of German artillery was much more successful and many more flares were lit by the infantry, when called for by the crews of contact aeroplanes. Army squadrons, Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) and French aircraft flew over the lines and attacked German aerodromes, troops and transport as far as the weather allowed. V Brigade tried to co-ordinate air operations over the battlefield with the infantry attack. Two De Havilland D.H.5 aircraft per division were provided, to engage any German strong-points interfering with the infantry attack on the final objective.

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>On the night of 16/17 August, French airmen set fire to the railway station at Kortemarck, 9.3 mi (15 km) east of Dixmude. ⇒8月16/17日の夜、フランス軍の飛行隊はディスムードの東9.3マイル(15キロ)にあるコルテマークで鉄道駅に砲火を放った。 >On 17 August, French heavy howitzers battered Les Lilas and Mondovi blockhouses all day and by nightfall both strong points had been breached and the garrisons taken prisoner. The total of prisoners taken since 16 August, exceeded 400 and fifteen guns had also been captured. From the southern edge of the inundations and swamps, between Dixmude and Drie Grachten, the French line had been pushed forward to the west bank of the Steenbeek, as far as the south end of St. Janshoek. ⇒8月17日、フランス軍の重曲射砲隊は一日中レ・リラス防塞とモンドヴィ防塞を乱打して、夕方までには両方の強化地点が破られ、駐屯軍は囚人として捕縛された。8月16日以来捕縛された囚人の合計は400人を越え、銃砲も15門が捕えられた。フランス軍戦線は、ディスムードとドライ・グラシュテンの間の洪水と湿地帯の南端から前方のシュテーンベークの西岸に向かって押し出て、サン・ヤンショークの南端に至った。 >South of Mondovi blockhouse, the Steenbeek had been crossed and on the extreme right, the First Army had swung northwards to the south bank of the Broombeek, which eliminated the possibility of the British Fifth Army being outflanked from the north. French engineers had worked in swamps and morasses to repair roads, bridge streams and build wire entanglements despite constant German artillery fire. The advance was made west of the northern stretch of the Wilhelm (third) line. ⇒最右翼の第1方面軍は、モンドヴィ防塞の南、シュテーンベークを横切り、北に向ってブルームベークの南岸に回り込んだ。それによって、英国第5方面軍は北から側面包囲される可能性が取り除かれた。フランス軍の工兵は、打ち続くドイツ軍砲兵隊の砲火にもかかわらず、道路、橋、水路を修理し、鉄条網を設置するために、湿地や沼地の中で働かねばならなかった。ウィルヘルム(第3)戦線北の、拡張部分の西に向けて進軍がなされた。 >Air operations Mist and cloud made air observation difficult on the morning of 16 August, until a wind began later in the day, although this blew the smoke of battle over the German lines, obscuring German troop movements. Corps squadrons were expected to provide artillery co-operation, contact and counter-attack patrols but low cloud, mist and smoke that morning resulted in most German counter-attack formations moving unnoticed. ⇒航空作戦行動 8月16日の朝は霧や雲が航空観察を困難にして、その日の午後に風が吹き始めるまで続いた。ただしそれは、ドイツ軍戦線上の爆撃戦の煙をドイツ軍戦線に吹きつけて、ドイツ軍隊の動きも覆い隠した。軍団の航空大隊は、砲撃の協力、接触、反撃パトロールを提供することが期待されたけれども、その日の朝は低い雲、霧、および煙のために、ドイツ軍の反撃編成隊は気づかれずに活動する、という結果を招いた。 >Flash-spotting* of German artillery was much more successful and many more flares were lit by the infantry, when called for by the crews of contact aeroplanes. Army squadrons, Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) and French aircraft flew over the lines and attacked German aerodromes, troops and transport as far as the weather allowed. V Brigade tried to co-ordinate air operations over the battlefield with the infantry attack. Two De Havilland D.H.5 aircraft per division were provided, to engage any German strong-points interfering with the infantry attack on the final objective. ⇒ドイツ軍の大砲をフラッシュ・スポッティング*(砲探知)するのは大いに成功して、接触飛行機の乗員に求められて、歩兵隊は多くの照明弾を点火した。方面軍航空大隊、英国海軍航空隊(RNAS)、およびフランス軍の航空隊が、戦線の上を飛び、天候が許す限りドイツ軍の飛行場、軍隊、および輸送施設を攻撃した。第V旅団は戦場上空の航空作戦行動について歩兵攻撃と調整するよう努めた。最終標的への歩兵隊の攻撃に介入して、あらゆるドイツ軍強化地点と交戦するために、1個師団あたり2機のデ・ハヴィランドD.H.5型航空機が提供された。 *Flash-spotting「光による砲探知」:夜間、砲撃の際に発する閃光が空に反射することを利用して、三角測量の手法で発光源(=砲の所在地)を探知すること。三角形の頂点(測量地点)から互に照明弾で位置などを知らせ合う。

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