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Laffert had expected that the two Eingreif divisions behind Messines Ridge, would reach the Höhen (second) line before the British. The divisions had reached assembly areas near Gheluvelt and Warneton by 7:00 a.m. and the 7th Division was ordered to move from Zandvoorde to Hollebeke, to attack across the Comines canal, towards Wijtschate into the British northern flank. The 1st Guard Reserve Division was to move to the Warneton line east of Messines, then advance around Messines to recapture the original front system. Both Eingreif divisions were plagued by delays, being new to the area and untrained for counter-attack operations. The 7th Division was shelled by British artillery all the way to the Comines canal, then part of the division was diverted to reinforce the remnants of the front divisions holding positions around Hollebeke. The rest of the division found that the British had already taken the Sehnen (Oosttaverne) line, by the time that they arrived at 4:00 p.m. The 1st Guard Reserve Division was also bombarded as it crossed the Warneton (third) line but reached the area east of Messines by 3:00 p.m., only to be devastated by the resumption of the British creeping barrage and forced back to the Sehnen (Oosttaverne) line, as the British began to advance to their next objective. Laffert contemplated a further withdrawal, then ordered the existing line to be held after the British advance stopped. Most of the losses inflicted on the British infantry by the German defence came from German artillery fire. In the days after the main attack, German shellfire on the new British lines was extremely accurate and well-timed, inflicting 90 percent of the casualties suffered by the 25th Division.

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>Laffert had expected that the two Eingreif divisions behind Messines Ridge, would reach the Höhen (second) line before the British. The divisions had reached assembly areas near Gheluvelt and Warneton by 7:00 a.m. and the 7th Division was ordered to move from Zandvoorde to Hollebeke, to attack across the Comines canal, towards Wijtschate into the British northern flank. ⇒ラフェルトは、メッシネス・リッジ背後のアイングリーフ2個師団が英国軍より前にホーヘン(第2)戦線に達すると予想した。その師団は、午前7時までにゲルヴェルトとヴァルネトン近くの集会地域に着いて、(そのうちの)第7師団は、ツァントフォルデからホレベケへ移動し、コミーヌ運河を横切り、ウィッツシャテの方へ向って英国軍北側面を攻撃するよう命令された。 >The 1st Guard Reserve Division was to move to the Warneton line east of Messines, then advance around Messines to recapture the original front system. Both Eingreif divisions were plagued by delays, being new to the area and untrained for counter-attack operations. The 7th Division was shelled by British artillery all the way to the Comines canal, then part of the division was diverted to reinforce the remnants of the front divisions holding positions around Hollebeke. ⇒第1護衛予備師団は、メッシネス東のヴァルネトン戦線へ移ることになっていたので、当初の前線システムを取り戻すためにメッシネス周辺へ進軍した。アイングリーフの両師団は、地域の新参であり、反撃の作戦活動のためには訓練されていなかったので、遅延によって苦しんだ。第7師団は、コミーヌ運河へ向かう途中ずっと英国軍の砲兵隊に砲撃されたので、ホレベケ周辺で陣地を守っている前線師団の残存兵をこの師団の一部が補強するように変更された。 >The rest of the division found that the British had already taken the Sehnen (Oosttaverne) line, by the time that they arrived at 4:00 p.m. The 1st Guard Reserve Division was also bombarded as it crossed the Warneton (third) line but reached the area east of Messines by 3:00 p.m., only to be devastated by the resumption of the British creeping barrage and forced back to the Sehnen (Oosttaverne) line, as the British began to advance to their next objective. ⇒師団の残り(補強隊以外)が午後4に到着したときには、すでに英国軍がゼーネン(オースタフェルネ)戦線を奪取していたことを知った。第1護衛予備師団はまた、ヴァルネトン(第3)戦線を横切るときに砲撃されながらも午後3時までにメッシネスの東地域に着いたが、英国軍の纏いつく集中砲火の再開によって損害を受け、英国軍が次の標的に向って進軍し始めたので、結局、ゼーネン(オースタフェルネ)戦線への退去を余儀なくされただけであった。 >Laffert contemplated a further withdrawal, then ordered the existing line to be held after the British advance stopped. Most of the losses inflicted on the British infantry by the German defence came from German artillery fire. In the days after the main attack, German shellfire on the new British lines was extremely accurate and well-timed, inflicting 90 percent of the casualties suffered by the 25th Division. ⇒ラフェルトは、更なる撤退を考えて、英国軍の進軍が止まったあと、既存の戦線を占拠するよう命令した。ドイツ軍の守備隊が英国歩兵連隊に課した損失の大部分は、大砲砲火によってもたらされたものであった。主要攻撃後数日のうちは、新しい英国軍戦線に対するドイツ軍の砲火砲弾は極めて正確でかつ好機をつかんで行われたので、第25師団に90%もの犠牲者を負わせた。

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