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The British Second Army had followed up some minor withdrawals and had fought the Action at Outtersteene Ridge on 18 August, after which there was a lull and Allied troops in the area were well rested by late September. Battle The Groupe d'Armées des Flandres (GAF, Flanders Army Group) attacked at 5:30 a.m. on 28 September, after a 3-hour artillery preparation, with 12 Belgian divisions, 10 British divisions of the Second Army and 6 French divisions of the Sixth Army. The British attacked on a 4.5 mi (7.2 km) front up to the Ypres–Zonnebeke road, from where the Belgian army attacked on a line north to Dixmude. The Allied attacks quickly penetrated the German defences and advanced up to 6 mi (9.7 km). The Germans were swiftly driven back. Much of the ground west of Passchendaele, which had been abandoned during the withdrawal of early 1918, was recaptured. Rain began to fall but by the evening the British had taken Kortewilde, Zandvoorde, Kruiseecke and Becelaere; Belgian troops had captured Zonnebeke, Poelcappelle, Schaap Baillie and Houthulst Forest. On the southern flank, minor operations by three British divisions advanced to St. Yves, Messines and the ridge from Wytschaete to Hollebeke. The German front line ran from Dixmude, to Houthult, Becelare, Zandvoorde and Hollebeke. Messines, Terhand and Dadizeele fell on 29 September and by the next day, despite the captured ground becoming another slough of mud, all of the high ground around Ypres had been occupied by the Allies. By 1 October, the left bank of the Lys had been captured up to Comines and the Belgians were beyond a line from Moorslede to Staden and Dixmude. The advance continued until 2 October, when German reinforcements arrived and the offensive outran its supplies. Due to the state of the ground, 15,000 rations were delivered by parachute from 80 Belgian and British aircraft. Aftermath Casualties The British suffered 4,695 casualties, the Belgians 4,500 "net" casualties from among 2,000 killed and 10,000 men ill or wounded. The Allies advanced up to 18 mi (29 km), with an average advance of 6 mi (9.7 km) and captured c. 10,000 prisoners, 300 guns and 600 machine-guns. Subsequent operations The offensive was continued with the Battle of Courtrai (14–19 October). The Battle of Cambrai, 1918 (also known as the Second Battle of Cambrai) was a battle between troops of the British First, Third and Fourth Armies and German Empire forces during the Hundred Days Offensive of the First World War. Cambrai カンブレー

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>The British Second Army had followed up some minor withdrawals and had fought the Action at Outtersteene Ridge on 18 August, after which there was a lull and Allied troops in the area were well rested by late September. ⇒英国第2方面軍は少し撤退を続けてから8月18日に「アウタースティーン・リッジの戦闘行動」で闘ったが、その後に小康状態があって、地域の連合国軍にとっては9月末までよい休息日となった。 >Battle  The Groupe d'Armées des Flandres (GAF, Flanders Army Group) attacked at 5:30 a.m. on 28 September, after a 3-hour artillery preparation, with 12 Belgian divisions, 10 British divisions of the Second Army and 6 French divisions of the Sixth Army. The British attacked on a 4.5 mi (7.2 km) front up to the Ypres–Zonnebeke road, from where the Belgian army attacked on a line north to Dixmude. The Allied attacks quickly penetrated the German defences and advanced up to 6 mi (9.7 km). The Germans were swiftly driven back. ⇒戦闘  フランドル方面軍グループ(GAF)は、3時間の砲撃準備の後、9月28日午前5時30分にベルギー軍の12個師団、第2方面軍の10個師団、およびフランス軍第6方面軍の6個師団をもって攻撃を開始した。英国軍はイープル‐ゾンネベケ道まで4.5マイル(7.2キロ)の前線を攻撃し、そこからベルギー方面軍がディクスムードに通じる北の戦線を攻撃した。連合国軍の攻撃はすぐにドイツ軍防衛帯に浸透し、最大6マイル(9.7キロ)進んだ。ドイツ軍は、素早く後退した。 >Much of the ground west of Passchendaele, which had been abandoned during the withdrawal of early 1918, was recaptured. Rain began to fall but by the evening the British had taken Kortewilde, Zandvoorde, Kruiseecke and Becelaere; Belgian troops had captured Zonnebeke, Poelcappelle, Schaap Baillie and Houthulst Forest. On the southern flank, minor operations by three British divisions advanced to St. Yves, Messines and the ridge from Wytschaete to Hollebeke. The German front line ran from Dixmude, to Houthult, Becelare, Zandvoorde and Hollebeke. ⇒1918年初期の撤退時に放棄されていたパスチェンデール西の地面の多くが再攻略された。雨が降り始めたが、英国軍は夕方までにコルテウィルデ、ザントヴォーデ、クルセッケおよびベセレールを奪取し、ベルギー軍はゾンネベケ、ポエルカッペル、シャアプ・ベーリー、ウツルスト森林を捕獲した。南側面では、英国軍の3個師団による小規模作戦行動によってサン・イヴ、メシーヌ、および、ウィツシャテからオレベケに至る尾根まで進軍した。ドイツ軍の前線はディクスムードからウツルト、ベセラール、ザントヴォーデ、オレベケまで走っていた。 >Messines, Terhand and Dadizeele fell on 29 September and by the next day, despite the captured ground becoming another slough of mud, all of the high ground around Ypres had been occupied by the Allies. By 1 October, the left bank of the Lys had been captured up to Comines and the Belgians were beyond a line from Moorslede to Staden and Dixmude. The advance continued until 2 October, when German reinforcements arrived and the offensive outran its supplies. Due to the state of the ground, 15,000 rations were delivered by parachute from 80 Belgian and British aircraft. ⇒メシーヌ、テランド、およびダディゼールは9月29日に陥落し、翌日までに、攻略された地面はもう1つの泥の荒地になったにもかかわらず、イープル周辺の高地のすべてが連合国軍によって占拠された。10月1日までに、リースの左岸はコミーヌまで攻略され、ベルギー軍はモルスレードからシュターデンやディクスムードまでの戦線を乗り越えていた。この進軍は、ドイツ軍の援軍が到着し、攻撃勢力に物資の供給が追いつかなくなった10月2日まで続いた。糧食は、地面の悪状態のため、ベルギー軍と英国軍の80機の航空機からパラシュートで15,000人分が配達された。 >Aftermath  Casualties The British suffered 4,695 casualties, the Belgians 4,500 "net" casualties from among 2,000 killed and 10,000 men ill or wounded. The Allies advanced up to 18 mi (29 km), with an average advance of 6 mi (9.7 km) and captured c. 10,000 prisoners, 300 guns and 600 machine-guns.・・・ >余波  犠牲者  英国軍は4,695人の犠牲者を被り、ベルギー軍は2,000人の死者と10,000人の罹病・負傷者のうち4,500人の「正味の」犠牲者を被った。連合国軍の平均進度は6マイル(9.7キロ)で、最大では18マイル(29キロ)進み、約10,000人の囚人、300丁の銃、600丁の機関銃を捕獲した。 >Subsequent operations  The offensive was continued with the Battle of Courtrai (14–19 October).  The Battle of Cambrai, 1918 (also known as the Second Battle of Cambrai) was a battle between troops of the British First, Third and Fourth Armies and German Empire forces during the Hundred Days Offensive of the First World War. ⇒その後の作戦行動  攻勢は、「カンブレーの戦い」(10月14‐19日)をもって継続された。  「カンブレーの戦い」、1918年(「第2次カンブレーの戦い」としても知られる)は、第1次世界大戦の「百日攻勢」の間、英国軍第1、第3、第4方面軍の軍隊とドイツ帝国軍団の間で行われた戦いであった。

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  • 日本語訳をお願い致します。

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    The Battle of Pilckem Ridge, 31 July – 2 August 1917, was the opening attack of the Third Battle of Ypres in the First World War. The British Fifth Army, Second Army and the French First Army on the northern flank, attacked the German 4th Army which defended the Western Front from Lille, to the Ypres Salient in Belgium and on to the North Sea coast. On 31 July, the Anglo-French armies captured Pilckem (Flemish: Pilkem) Ridge and areas either side, the French attack being a great success. After several weeks of changeable weather, heavy rain fell during the afternoon of 31 July. British observers in the XIX Corps area in the centre, lost sight of the troops that had advanced to the main objective at the green line and three reserve brigades pressing on towards the red line. The weather changed just as German regiments from specialist counter-attack Eingreif divisions intervened. The reserve brigades were forced back through the green line to the intermediate black line, which the British artillery-observers could still see and the German counter-attack was stopped by massed artillery and small-arms fire. The attack had mixed results; a substantial amount of ground was captured by the British and French, except on the Gheluvelt Plateau on the right flank, where only the blue line (first objective) and part of the black line (second objective) were captured. A large number of casualties were inflicted on the German defenders, 5,626 German prisoners were taken and the German Eingreif divisions managed to recapture some ground from the Ypres–Roulers railway, northwards to St. Julien. For the next few days, both sides made local attacks to improve their positions, much hampered by the wet weather. The rains had a serious effect on operations in August, causing more problems for the British and French, who were advancing into the area devastated by artillery fire and partly flooded by the unseasonable rain. A local British attack on the Gheluvelt Plateau was postponed because of the weather until 10 August and the second big general attack due on 4 August, could not begin until 16 August. Pilckem Ridge ピルケム高地

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