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Eighty dead German soldiers were counted later, in and around the British front trenches. By 7:30 a.m., the German raid was over and during the night, two British battalions were relieved; the rest of 28 April was quiet, except for a raid by the 1st Division, at the "Double Crassier" near Loos. At 3:45 a.m., a German artillery bombardment and gas discharge began on the 16th Division front but the expected attack did not occur. German troops were seen massing in the trenches near Hulluch at 4:10 a.m. and small numbers advanced towards the British trenches, where they were engaged by small-arms fire. The German gas then reversed course and German infantry on a 0.5-mile (0.80 km) front ran to the rear through the gas and British artillery-fire, leaving about 120 dead on the front of the 16th Division.

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>Eighty dead German soldiers were counted later, in and around the British front trenches. By 7:30 a.m., the German raid was over and during the night, two British battalions were relieved; the rest of 28 April was quiet, except for a raid by the 1st Division, at the "Double Crassier" near Loos. At 3:45 a.m., a German artillery bombardment and gas discharge began on the 16th Division front but the expected attack did not occur. ⇒後になって、英国軍の前線塹壕の内外で、ドイツ軍兵士の死者が80人を数えた。午前7時30分までにはドイツ軍の急襲が終ったので、夜の間に英国軍の2個大隊が救援された。ルース近くの「ドゥブル・クラッシエ(仏:鉱渣捨場)」に対する第1師団の急襲を除いて、4月28日の残り後半は静かであった。午前3時45分に、ドイツ軍の砲撃とガス放射が第16師団前線から始まったが、予想されたような襲撃は起こらなかった。 >German troops were seen massing in the trenches near Hulluch at 4:10 a.m. and small numbers advanced towards the British trenches, where they were engaged by small-arms fire. The German gas then reversed course and German infantry on a 0.5-mile (0.80 km) front ran to the rear through the gas and British artillery-fire, leaving about 120 dead on the front of the 16th Division. ⇒午前4時10分、ドイツ軍隊がユルーシ近くの塹壕に集まっているのが見られ、そのうちの少数が英国軍の塹壕に向かって進んだので、小銃砲火の戦いが交わされた。それからドイツ軍のガスはコースを反転し、0.5マイル(0.8キロ)にわたる前線上に展開するドイツ軍歩兵連隊が、ガスと英国軍の大砲砲火をくぐって後衛部に向って走り、第16師団の前線でおよそ120人に死をもたらした。

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