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Next day a battalion of the 42nd Division edged forward 100 yd (91 m) and a battalion of the 58th Division attacked the Winnipeg pillbox; in the evening a German counter-attack took ground towards Springfield. On 15 September, covered by a hurricane bombardment, a battalion of the 47th Division attacked and captured a strong point near Inverness Copse, fire from which had devastated earlier attacks and took 36 prisoners. A battalion of the 42nd Division captured Sans Souci and the 51st Division launched a "Chinese" attack using dummies. A day later, a German attack on the strong point renamed Cryer Farm, captured by the 47th Division was defeated with many German losses and in the XIV Corps area, another attack was stopped by small-arms fire by the 20th Division. A party of the Guards Division was cut off near Ney Copse and fought its way out; a lull followed until 20 September. Plan of attack Plumer planned to capture Gheluvelt Plateau in four steps at six day intervals, for time to bring forward artillery and supplies, a faster tempo of operations than that envisaged by Gough before 31 July. Each step was to have even more limited geographical objectives, with infantry units attacking on narrower fronts in greater depth. The practice of attacking the first objective with two battalions and the following objectives with a battalion each was reversed, in view of the greater density of German defences the further the attack penetrated; double the medium and heavy artillery was available than for on 31 July. Reorganisation in this manner had been recommended in a report of 25 August, by the Fifth Army General Officer Commanding RA (GOCRA) Major-General H. Uniacke. The evolution in organisation and method was to ensure that more infantry were on tactically advantageous ground, having had time to consolidate and regain contact with their artillery before German counter-attacks. The British began a "desultory bombardment" on 31 August and also sought to neutralise the German artillery with gas before the attack, including gas bombardments on the three evenings before the assault.

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>Next day a battalion of the 42nd Division edged forward 100 yd (91 m) and a battalion of the 58th Division attacked the Winnipeg pillbox; in the evening a German counter-attack took ground towards Springfield. On 15 September, covered by a hurricane bombardment, a battalion of the 47th Division attacked and captured a strong point near Inverness Copse, fire from which had devastated earlier attacks and took 36 prisoners. ⇒その翌日、第42師団の1個大隊がじわじわと100ヤード(91m)前方へ進み、第58師団の1個大隊がウィニペグ・ピルボックスを攻撃した。夕方、ドイツ軍の反撃はスプリングフィールド方面の地面を取った。9月15日、ハリケーン砲撃の援護を受けて、第47師団の1個大隊がインヴァーネス雑木林近くの強化地点を攻撃し、攻略し、36人の囚人を捕縛した。以前の攻撃は、そこインヴァーネスからの砲火で挫折させられたのであった。 >A battalion of the 42nd Division captured Sans Souci and the 51st Division launched a "Chinese" attack using dummies. A day later, a German attack on the strong point renamed Cryer Farm, captured by the 47th Division was defeated with many German losses and in the XIV Corps area, another attack was stopped by small-arms fire by the 20th Division. A party of the Guards Division was cut off near Ney Copse and fought its way out; a lull followed until 20 September. ⇒第42師団の1個大隊がサン・スーシを攻略して、第51師団は、ダミーを使って「中国風の」(手の込んだ)攻撃を開始した。その1日後、第47師団によって攻略されてクライヤー農場と改名された強化地点に対するドイツ軍の攻撃は、ドイツ軍の大損失を伴う敗北に帰し、第XIV軍団地域における別の攻撃は、第20師団による小形火器で食い止められた。護衛・監視師団の1個部隊がネイ雑木林近くで切り離され、孤立したが、何とか脱出した。そして9月20日まで、小康が続いた。 >Plan of attack Plumer planned to capture Gheluvelt Plateau in four steps at six day intervals, for time to bring forward artillery and supplies, a faster tempo of operations than that envisaged by Gough before 31 July. Each step was to have even more limited geographical objectives, with infantry units attacking on narrower fronts in greater depth. The practice of attacking the first objective with two battalions and the following objectives with a battalion each was reversed, in view of the greater density of German defences the further the attack penetrated; double the medium and heavy artillery was available than for on 31 July. ⇒攻撃の計画 プルーマーは、大砲と供給品を前面に持ち出す時間のために6日の間隔をとって、4つの段階を踏んでゲルヴェルト高原を攻略する計画を立てたが、それは7月31日以前にゴフの考察したものより作戦行動のテンポがより速い。個々の段階は、歩兵隊の各部隊が狭い前線をより深く攻撃するよう、標的を地理的により狭く限定することにした。ドイツ軍防御の密度が大きければ大きいほど攻撃はより深く侵入することを考慮して、最初の標的を2個大隊で攻撃する実行と、続く標的を1個大隊で攻撃する実行とをそれぞれ反転した。中砲と重砲は、7月31日の場合の2倍が入手可能であった。 >Reorganisation in this manner had been recommended in a report of 25 August, by the Fifth Army General Officer Commanding RA* (GOCRA) Major-General H. Uniacke. The evolution in organisation and method was to ensure that more infantry were on tactically advantageous ground, having had time to consolidate and regain contact with their artillery before German counter-attacks. ⇒この方法での再編は、第5方面軍英国王立砲兵隊*総司令官(GOCRA)、H.ユニアック少将の8月25日の報告において推奨された。この組織と方法の発展は、ドイツ軍の反撃の前で自軍の砲兵隊との接触を確保し統合する時間を持てて、より多くの歩兵が戦術的に有利な立場に立つことを保証するはずであった。 *RA (Royal Artillery):「英国王立砲兵隊」。 >The British began a "desultory bombardment" on 31 August and also sought to neutralise the German artillery with gas before the attack, including gas bombardments on the three evenings before the assault. ⇒英国軍は8月31日に「突飛な砲撃」を開始し、襲撃前の3日間の夕方に実施されるガス砲撃を含めて、ドイツ軍の砲兵隊を弱体化することにも努めた。

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