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The advance was to be by bounds to objective lines behind a creeping barrage moving at 90 m (98 yd) every four minutes, with pauses to make sure that the French barrage kept pace with the British barrage. The first objective was the two German lines east of the Yser Canal and the second objective was the German third line. A total advance of 5,000 yards (4,600 m) to the red line was not fundamental to the plan, being an attempt to provide enough discretion to the divisional commanders to make local advances without the need to request permission, based on the extent of local German resistance, in accordance with the manual SS 135. This was intended to avoid situations that had occurred in previous offensives, when vacant ground had not been promptly occupied and had then to be fought for in later attacks. Had the German defence collapsed and the red line been reached, the German Flandern I, II and III Stellungen would have been intact, except for Flandern I Stellung for a mile south of Broodseinde. On 10 August, II Corps was required to reach the black line of 31 July, an advance of 400–900 yards (370–820 m) and at the Battle of Langemarck on 16 August, the Fifth Army was to advance 1,500 yards (1,400 m). The German 4th Army operation order for the defensive battle was issued on 27 June. The German 4th Army had about 600 aircraft of the Luftstreitkräfte, 200 being single-seat fighters; eventually eighty German air units operated over the Flanders front. German defences had been arranged as a forward zone, main battle zone and rearward battle zone. The defence in depth began with a front system of three breastworks each about 200 yards (180 m) apart, garrisoned by the four companies of each front battalion, with listening-posts in no man's land. About 2,000 yards (1,800 m) behind these works was the Albrecht Stellung (second line), a secondary or artillery protective line that marked the rear boundary of the forward zone.

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>The advance was to be by bounds to objective lines behind a creeping barrage moving at 90 m (98 yd) every four minutes, with pauses to make sure that the French barrage kept pace with the British barrage. The first objective was the two German lines east of the Yser Canal and the second objective was the German third line. ⇒フランス軍の集中砲火が、英国軍の集中砲火と足並みが揃っていることを確認するための休止を入れながら、4分おきに90m(98ヤード)動かす、纏いつく集中砲火の庇護下で、進軍(隊)は標的の戦線のそばに寄ることになっていた。最初の標的はイゼール運河東の2本のドイツ軍戦線で、第2の標的はドイツ軍の3本目の戦線であった。 >A total advance of 5,000 yards (4,600 m) to the red line was not fundamental to the plan, being an attempt to provide enough discretion to the divisional commanders to make local advances without the need to request permission*, based on the extent of local German resistance, in accordance with the manual SS 135. This was intended to avoid situations that had occurred in previous offensives, when vacant ground had not been promptly occupied and had then to be fought for in later attacks. ⇒赤線部への5,000ヤード(4,600m)の全進軍が計画の基本ではなかった。それは、SS 135手引きに従って抵抗する局地的なドイツ軍の行動範囲に応じて、許可を要請する必要なしでその局地に進軍するのに十分な判断材料を師団長に提供する試みであった*。これは前の攻撃で起こった状況を避けることを目的とした。その状況とはすなわち、空いている地面をすぐに占拠しなかったばかりに、それから後の攻撃でそれをめぐって戦わなければならなかったことである。 *ぎこちない訳文で恐縮です。 >Had the German defence collapsed and the red line been reached, the German Flandern I, II and III Stellungen would have been intact, except for Flandern I Stellung for a mile south of Broodseinde. On 10 August, II Corps was required to reach the black line of 31 July, an advance of 400–900 yards (370–820 m) and at the Battle of Langemarck on 16 August, the Fifth Army was to advance 1,500 yards (1,400 m). ⇒もしも、ドイツ軍の防御を崩壊させて赤線部に到着できれば、ブルードサインデの南1マイルのフランドル第I陣地を除いて、ドイツ軍のフランドル第I、第II、第III陣地は無傷のままであろう。8月10日、第II軍団は、400–900ヤード(370–820m)進軍して7月31日の黒線部に到達することを要求され、第5方面軍は8月16日の「ランゲマークの戦い」で、1,500ヤード(1,400m)を進軍することになった。 >The German 4th Army operation order for the defensive battle was issued on 27 June. The German 4th Army had about 600 aircraft of the Luftstreitkräfte, 200 being single-seat fighters; eventually eighty German air units operated over the Flanders front. German defences had been arranged as a forward zone, main battle zone and rearward battle zone. ⇒6月27日、防御戦のためのドイツ軍第4方面軍の作戦行動指令が出された。ドイツ軍第4方面軍は、ドイツ空軍機のおよそ600機の航空機を擁していた(そのうち200の戦闘機は一人乗り)。結局、80個のドイツ運航空隊がフランドル前線上空で作戦展開した。ドイツ軍の守備隊は、前方地帯、主要交戦地帯、および後部交戦地帯といった形(の区分)に配置されていた。 >The defence in depth began with a front system of three breastworks each about 200 yards (180 m) apart, garrisoned by the four companies of each front battalion, with listening-posts in no man's land. About 2,000 yards (1,800 m) behind these works was the Albrecht Stellung (second line), a secondary or artillery protective line that marked the rear boundary of the forward zone. ⇒縱深防御体制は、それぞれ約200ヤード(180m)間隔に敷設された3か所の胸墻の前線システムから始まって、聴音哨(敵の動きを事前に察知するための前線基地)が中間地帯にあって、各前線付大隊の4個中隊が守備陣を張っていた。これらの施設の後方およそ2,000ヤード(1,800m)にアルブレヒト陣地(第2戦線)があって、それは前方地帯の後部境界線を画する第2の、すなわち、砲兵隊の守備戦線になっていた。

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