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The operation was intended to engage as many German formations as possible and to prevent them from reinforcing the Ypres sector during the Third Battle of Ypres. Command of the Canadian Corps had only recently changed. A month earlier, Canadian Corps commander Julian Byng was promoted to General and replaced General Edmund Allenby as commander of the Third Army. Arthur Currie, the 1st Canadian Division commander, was promoted to Lieutenant-General and assumed command of the Canadian Corps. Currie regarded control of either Hill 70 or Sallaumines Hill as tactically more important than control of the city of Lens. Merely to occupy the city while the Germans held the high ground, would place the attackers in an unfavourably lower and more exposed position than the ones they occupied. At a conference of corps commanders, Currie persuaded the First Army commander General Henry Horne to make Hill 70, not Lens, the main objective of the limited offensive. Controlling Hill 70 would provide excellent observation over the German lines, in preparation for more offensives. Currie believed the Germans would attempt to counter-attack if Hill 70 were captured, largely because of its observational importance. Nevertheless, Currie believed that the advantageous observational position of Hill 70 would permit well directed artillery to effectively deal with any counter-attacks. The plan was therefore to occupy the high ground quickly, establish defensive positions and utilize combined small arms and artillery fire to repel expected counter-attacks and inflict as many casualties as possible. In an attempt to further deceive the Germans, minor operations were conducted in an effort to suggest a forthcoming attack by the British First Army south of La Bassée Canal. This included an attack by the 9th Canadian Brigade against units of the German 36th Reserve Division at Mericourt Trench and a British First Army poison gas attack north of Loos, both in late July 1917. Bad weather led to the postponement of the attack on Hill 70 from late July until mid-August.

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>The operation was intended to engage as many German formations as possible and to prevent them from reinforcing the Ypres sector during the Third Battle of Ypres. ⇒作戦行動は、できるだけ多くのドイツ軍編成軍と交戦して、彼らに「第3次イープルの戦い」の間イープル地区への補強を妨げることを意図していた。 >Command of the Canadian Corps had only recently changed. A month earlier, Canadian Corps commander Julian Byng was promoted to General and replaced General Edmund Allenby as commander of the Third Army. Arthur Currie, the 1st Canadian Division commander, was promoted to Lieutenant-General and assumed command of the Canadian Corps. Currie regarded control of either Hill 70 or Sallaumines Hill as tactically more important than control of the city of Lens. ⇒カナダ軍団の指揮(官)は、最近代わったばかりであった。1ヶ月前、カナダ軍団の指揮官ジュリアン・ビングが将軍に昇進して、第3方面軍の指揮官としてエドモンド・アレンビ将軍の後を継いだ。カナダ軍第1方面軍の指揮官アーサー・カリーは、中将に昇進してカナダ軍の指揮を引き受けた。カリーは、70番ヒルあるいはサロミネス・ヒルの支配権がレンズ市の支配より戦術的に重要であると考えた。 >Merely to occupy the city while the Germans held the high ground, would place the attackers in an unfavourably lower and more exposed position than the ones they occupied. At a conference of corps commanders, Currie persuaded the First Army commander General Henry Horne to make Hill 70, not Lens, the main objective of the limited offensive. Controlling Hill 70 would provide excellent observation over the German lines, in preparation for more offensives. ⇒ドイツ軍が高地を保持する間、攻撃隊はもっぱら都市部を占拠することとしたので、(目下)占拠しているところより低地にあって露出がより多くなるような不利な陣地に配置されることになった。軍団指揮官らの会議で、カリーは、レンズ(市)でなく70番ヒルを限定攻撃の主要標的とするよう、第1方面軍の指揮官ヘンリー・ホーン将軍を説得した。より多くの攻撃に備えて、70番ヒルを支配すれば、ドイツ軍の戦線上に対する優れた観察が提供されるだろう(から)。 >Currie believed the Germans would attempt to counter-attack if Hill 70 were captured, largely because of its observational importance. Nevertheless, Currie believed that the advantageous observational position of Hill 70 would permit well directed artillery to effectively deal with any counter-attacks. The plan was therefore to occupy the high ground quickly, establish defensive positions and utilize combined small arms and artillery fire to repel expected counter-attacks and inflict as many casualties as possible. ⇒70番ヒルを攻略した場合には、おもにその観察能の重要性のためドイツ軍が反撃しようとするだろう、とカリーは思っていた。それでも、70番ヒルの観察に有利な立地によって、いかなる反撃にも効果的に対処できるような、狙い定めた砲撃ができるだろう、ともカリーは信じていた。したがって、計画としては、素早く高地を占拠し、防御用陣地を確立し、予想される反撃を撃退して、できるだけ多くの犠牲者を負わせるために小銃と大砲砲火の組み合わせ(攻撃法)を活用することであった。 >In an attempt to further deceive the Germans, minor operations were conducted in an effort to suggest a forthcoming attack by the British First Army south of La Bassée Canal. This included an attack by the 9th Canadian Brigade against units of the German 36th Reserve Division at Mericourt Trench and a British First Army poison gas attack north of Loos, both in late July 1917. ⇒さらにドイツ軍をあざむこうとして、ラ・バセー運河南の英国第1方面軍による継続攻撃を示唆する奮闘として小規模な作戦行動が行われた。これには、メリクール塹壕のドイツ軍第36予備師団の部隊に対する、カナダ軍第9旅団による攻撃とロース北の英国第1方面軍の毒ガス攻撃とが含まれていた。両方とも1917年7月下旬(の予定)であった。 >Bad weather led to the postponement of the attack on Hill 70 from late July until mid-August. ⇒(しかし)この70番ヒルへの攻撃は、悪天候のために、7月下旬から8月中旬まで延期されるに至った。

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