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Prior to Sykes's departure to meet Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Sazonov in Petrograd on 27 February 1916, Sykes was approached with a plan by Samuel in the form of a memorandum which Sykes thought prudent to commit to memory and then destroy. He also suggested to Samuel that if Belgium should assume the administration of Palestine it might be more acceptable to France as an alternative to the international administration which France wanted and the Zionists did not. Of the boundaries marked on a map attached to the memorandum he wrote: "By excluding Hebron and the East of the Jordan there is less to discuss with the Moslems, as the Mosque of Omar then becomes the only matter of vital importance to discuss with them and further does away with any contact with the bedouins, who never cross the river except on business. I imagine that the principal object of Zionism is the realization of the ideal of an existing centre of nationality rather than boundaries or extent of territory. The moment I return I will let you know how things stand at Pd."

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以下のとおりお答えします。ユダヤ国家設立のための模索の状況を述べています。歴史的知識がない、なじみのない固有名詞が頻出する、構文が複雑、などの理由で訳文がどの程度正確か自信ありません。間違いがあるかも知れませんが、その節はどうぞ悪しからず。 >Prior to Sykes's departure to meet Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Sazonov in Petrograd on 27 February 1916, Sykes was approached with a plan by Samuel in the form of a memorandum which Sykes thought prudent to commit to memory and then destroy. He also suggested to Samuel that if Belgium should assume the administration of Palestine it might be more acceptable to France as an alternative to the international administration which France wanted and the Zionists did not. Of the boundaries marked on a map attached to the memorandum he wrote: ⇒1916年2月27日にペトログラードでロシア外務大臣セルゲイ・サゾノフと会うためにサイクスが出発するのに先がけて、彼サイクスはサミュエルから覚書という形である計画を持ちかけられたが、彼はそれを記憶に留めておいて、あとで破棄するのが分別ある行為だろうと考えた。彼はまた、もしベルギーがパレスチナの管理をすると仮定するならば、それはフランスにとっては、フランスが望みかつシオニストが望まない国際的な管理に対する代案としてより容認しやすいだろう、ということをサミュエルに提案した。覚書に添付されていた地図のマーク縁外に、彼はこう書いた。 >"By excluding Hebron and the East of the Jordan there is less to discuss with the Moslems, as the Mosque of Omar then becomes the only matter of vital importance to discuss with them and further does away with any contact with the bedouins, who never cross the river except on business. I imagine that the principal object of Zionism is the realization of the ideal of an existing centre of nationality rather than boundaries or extent of territory. The moment I return I will let you know how things stand at Pd*." ⇒曰く、「ヨルダンのヘブロンと東部を除くことで、イスラム教徒との議論の余地は少なくなります。彼らにとっては、オマールのモスクが唯一の絶対重要な問題になるのであって、それ以上はベドウィンとの交渉上いかなる問題もありません。なぜなら、彼らは仕事を除いては決してその川を渡ってくることがないからです。シオニズムの主要目的は、民族国家の領土の境界や範囲(の確保)というよりは、その本部を存在あらしめるという理想の実現である、と私は想像しています。私が戻ったらすぐあなたに、パレスチナ地域*がどのような状況になっているかお知らせします。」 *Pd:"Palestine district"「パレスチナ地域」の略語と考えましたが、間違っているかも知れません。

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