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Next day, parties of Germans at Beugny in the R. III Stellung fought until nightfall then slipped away. A party at Vaulx Vraucourt was surprised (while some were shaving) and driven back to Lagnicourt. On 20 March, an Australian attack on Noreuil failed with 331 casualties and an attack on Croisilles was repulsed. A German counter-attack to recover Beaumetz was mounted on 23 March and got into the village before being forced to withdraw; the attack was repeated next day but only one party reached the village. Lagnicourt was lost on 26 March and a counter-attack from Noreuil repulsed, then a British attack on Bucquoy was defeated. The 2nd Army conducted the withdrawal with the line-holding divisions, which were fresher than those of the 1st Army and with several cavalry divisions and cyclist battalions. On 17 March, withdrawals began north of the Avre and by 18 March, the German 7th, 2nd, 1st and the southern wing of the 6th Army, began to withdraw from the old front-line (110 miles (180 km) in length, 65 miles (105 km) as the crow flies).

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>Next day, parties of Germans at Beugny in the R. III Stellung fought until nightfall then slipped away. A party at Vaulx Vraucourt was surprised (while some were shaving) and driven back to Lagnicourt. On 20 March, an Australian attack on Noreuil failed with 331 casualties and an attack on Croisilles was repulsed. ⇒次の日、R. III 陣地のボニィに駐留するドイツ軍の数団体が夕暮れまで戦って、それから抜け出した。ヴォー・ヴラクールの1団体は、奇襲を受けて(ひげ剃りをしている者もいた)、ラニクールに追い返された。3月20日に、ノレイルに対するオーストラリア軍の攻撃では331人の犠牲者を被って失敗し、クロワズィーユへの攻撃は撃退された。 >A German counter-attack to recover Beaumetz was mounted on 23 March and got into the village before being forced to withdraw; the attack was repeated next day but only one party reached the village. Lagnicourt was lost on 26 March and a counter-attack from Noreuil repulsed, then a British attack on Bucquoy was defeated. ⇒ボーメッツを回復するためのドイツ軍の反撃は、3月23日に開始され、撤退を強いられる前に村に入った。攻撃は次の日も繰り返されたが、村まで着いたのは1団体のみであった。3月26日にラニクールが失われたけれども、ノレイルからの反撃が追い返したので、それで英国軍のブッコイへの攻撃は破られた。 >The 2nd Army conducted the withdrawal with the line-holding divisions, which were fresher than those of the 1st Army and with several cavalry divisions and cyclist battalions. On 17 March, withdrawals began north of the Avre and by 18 March, the German 7th, 2nd, 1st and the southern wing of the 6th Army, began to withdraw from the old front-line (110 miles (180 km) in length, 65 miles (105 km) as the crow flies). ⇒第2方面軍は、戦線を保持する第1方面軍のそれより新しい師団とともに、また数個の騎兵隊やサイクリスト大隊とともに、撤退を指揮した。撤退は3月17日にアーヴルの北で開始して、3月18日までには第6方面軍の第7、第2、第1、および南翼(の各師団)が旧前線(長さ110マイル〈180キロ〉、直線距離で65マイル〈105キロ〉)から撤退し始めた。

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