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お願いします (13) The Romans were completely outnumbered, and the men with Horatius panicked. They threw their weapons on the ground and started running. Horatius begged them to stay and fight. He said it would be foolish to run away, leaving the enemy free to cross the bridge and march into Rome. Shouting over the noise of battle, he asked them at least to destroy the bridge, if they were too afraid to fight. He would meet the enemy alone on the other side. (14) Horatius's courage astonished Romans and Etruscans alike, but only two Roman soldiers were brave enough to cross the bridge and fight beside him. The three men fought on the riverbank while the rest of the Romans hacked away at the bridge with their swords. When only a small strip of bridge was left, Horatius insisted that his two companions return across it to safety. (15) Livy tells the story of how Horatius stood alone, facing the enemy: “Looking round with eyes dark with menace upon the Etruscan chiefs, he challenged tham to single combat, calling tham the slaves of a tyrant king....” At first the Etruscans held back, but then, shamed by Horatius's courage, they began to hurl their javelins at him. Horatius caught their weapons on his shield. “As stubborn as ever, he stood on the bridge, his feet planted wide apart. The Etruscans were about to charge him when two sounds split the air: the crash of the broken bridge and the cheer of the Romans when they saw the bridge fall.” (16) This stopped the Etruscans in their tracks. Then Horatius prayed to the god of the river. “‘Holy Father Tiber...receive these arms and your soldier into your kindly waters.’ With that, he jumped into the river with all his armor on and safely swam across to his friends: an act of daring more famous than believable in later times.” The Roman people placed a statue in the public square to honor Horatius. As a reward for his amazing courage, they gave him as much land as he could plow in a day.

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(13) ローマ人は、完全に人数で負けていたので、ホラティウスの部下たちは、うろたえました。彼らは、武器を地面に放り投げて、逃げ始めました。ホラティウスは、彼らに留まって、戦うように頼みました。彼は、逃げることは、愚かであると言いました、逃げれば、敵に自由に橋を渡ってローマに進軍させることになるからです。戦いの騒音よりも大きな声で叫んで、彼は、彼らが、恐ろしくて戦えないのであれば、少なくとも、彼らに橋を破壊するよう頼みました。彼は、向こう岸で、一人で敵に立ち向かうつもりでした。 (14) ホラティウスの勇気は、ローマ人とエトルリア人双方を驚かしました、しかし、勇気を出して、橋を渡り、彼のそばで戦ったのは、2人のローマの兵士だけでした。その3人の男は、川岸で戦いました、他方、残りのローマ人は、彼らの剣で橋をたたき壊しました。橋の残りが、ごく狭い部分だけになった時、ホラティウスは、彼の2人の仲間に、それを渡って、安全な所に戻るようにと命じました。 (15) リヴィは、ホラティウスが、どのように一人で敵に立ち向かったかを語ります:「エトルリアの隊長たちを威嚇するような目つきで見まわして、彼は、彼らを暴君の奴隷と呼んで、彼らに一騎討ちを挑みました....」最初、エトルリア人は、ためらいました、しかし、ホラティウスの勇気に名誉を傷つけられて、彼らは、投げ槍を彼に投げつけ始めました。ホラティウスは、彼の盾で彼らの武器を捕えました。「あいかわらず頑なに、彼は、足を広く踏ん張って、橋の上に立っていました。 エトルリア人が、正に、彼を襲おうとしていた時、二つの音が、空気をつんざきました:壊れた橋が崩壊する音と橋が落ちるのを見たローマ人の歓声でした。」 (16) これは、エトルリア人を急に立ち止まらせました。その時、ホラティウスは、川の神に祈りました。「『父なるテベレ川の神よ ... 汝の優しき水にこれらの武器と汝の兵士を迎えたまえ。』そう叫ぶと、彼は、鎧を身にまとったまま、川に飛び込み、味方の方へ無事泳ぎつきました:後の時代には、信じられないほど有名になった大胆な行為でした。」ローマの人々は、ホラティウスに敬意を表して、公共広場に像を建てました。彼の驚くべき勇気の報酬として、彼らは、彼に彼が一日で耕すことができる広さの土地を与えました。

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