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On 13 March, a document revealing the plan and the code-name Alberich dated 5 March, was found in Loupart Wood. On 24 February Lieutenant-General Hubert Gough defined the boundaries of the three corps making the advance and ordered them to regain contact with the German armies, using strong patrols supported by larger forces moving forward more deliberately behind them. The German front-line was being maintained along the rest of the front and the possibility of a sudden German counter-offensive was not discounted. On 25 February, the 2nd Australian Division advanced on Malt Trench, found it strongly held and was forced to retire with 174 casualties. The Fifth Army divisions advanced with patrols until they met German resistance, then prepared deliberate attacks, some of which were forestalled by German withdrawals, which by 26 February had abandoned the ground west of the R. I Stellung apart from small detachments.

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>On 13 March, a document revealing the plan and the code-name Alberich dated 5 March, was found in Loupart Wood. On 24 February Lieutenant-General Hubert Gough defined the boundaries of the three corps making the advance and ordered them to regain contact with the German armies, using strong patrols supported by larger forces moving forward more deliberately behind them. The German front-line was being maintained along the rest of the front and the possibility of a sudden German counter-offensive was not discounted. ⇒3月13日、計画(内容)や暗号名アルベリヒを露出している3月5日付の文書がルパール・ウッドで発見された。2月24日、ヒューバート・ゴフ中将は、進軍中の3個軍団間の境界を定めて、強力なパトロール隊を利用してドイツ方面軍との接触を回復するよう、そして、そのパトロール隊はその後方から慎重に前進しているより大規模な軍団が支援するよう、(軍団の各筋に)命令した。ドイツ軍の戦線は、(いまだ)前線の残り部分に沿って維持されていて、突然ドイツ軍の反撃に会う可能性は予断を許さなかった。 >On 25 February, the 2nd Australian Division advanced on Malt Trench, found it strongly held and was forced to retire with 174 casualties. The Fifth Army divisions advanced with patrols until they met German resistance, then prepared deliberate attacks, some of which were forestalled by German withdrawals, which by 26 February had abandoned the ground west of the R. I Stellung apart from small detachments. ⇒2月25日、第2オーストラリア師団がモルト塹壕に向かって進軍して、それが強力に維持されているのを発見し、174人の犠牲者を被って退却することを余儀なくされた。第5方面軍は、ドイツ軍の抵抗に会うまでパトロール隊とともに進み、慎重な攻撃を準備した。そして、その幾つかはドイツの撤退によって機先を制された。それは、2月26日までに、小さな分遣隊を除いてR. I 陣地西の地を放棄していたのである。

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