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The result was disastrous on three grounds. Firstly, it associated the monarchy with the unpopular war; secondly, Nicholas proved to be a poor leader of men on the front, often irritating his own commanders with his interference; and thirdly, being at the front made him unavailable to govern. This left the reins of power to his wife, the German Tsarina Alexandra, who was unpopular and accused of being a spy and under the thumb of her confidant Grigori Rasputin, himself so unpopular that he was assassinated by members of the nobility in December 1916. The Tsarina proved an ineffective ruler in a time of war, announcing a rapid succession of different Prime Ministers and angering the Duma. The lack of strong leadership is illustrated by a telegram from Octobrist politician Mikhail Rodzianko to the Tsar on 11 March [O.S. 26 February] 1917, in which Rodzianko begged for a minister with the "confidence of the country" be instated immediately. Delay, he wrote, would be "tantamount to death".

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>The result was disastrous on three grounds. Firstly, it associated the monarchy with the unpopular war; secondly, Nicholas proved to be a poor leader of men on the front, often irritating his own commanders with his interference; and thirdly, being at the front made him unavailable to govern. ⇒結果は、3つの根拠によって壊滅的であった。第1に、それ(ツァーの戦闘指揮)は君主制と、それを不人気にする戦争とを結びつけた。第2に、ニコラスは前線では指揮が下手であることが分かって、しばしば彼の干渉によって部下の指揮官を苛立たせた。そして、第3に、前線にあることで、政治的統治が不可能になった。 >This left the reins of power to his wife, the German Tsarina Alexandra, who was unpopular and accused of being a spy and under the thumb of her confidant Grigori Rasputin, himself so unpopular that he was assassinated by members of the nobility in December 1916. The Tsarina proved an ineffective ruler in a time of war, announcing a rapid succession of different Prime Ministers and angering the Duma. ⇒このことから彼は統治権を妻、ドイツ人皇后アレクサンドラに任せたが、その人は不人気で、スパイの廉で告発され、彼女の親友グリゴリ・ラスプーチンの言いなりになっていた。ところが、その彼がまた不人気で、1916年12月に貴族のメンバーによって暗殺されたほどである。皇后は、戦争時間には役に立たない統治者であることが分かった。そして、(突如)異なる首相への迅速な継承を発表して、ドゥーマ(ロシア帝国議会)を怒らせた。 >The lack of strong leadership is illustrated by a telegram from Octobrist* politician Mikhail Rodzianko to the Tsar on 11 March [O.S. 26 February] 1917, in which Rodzianko begged for a minister with the "confidence of the country" be instated immediately. Delay, he wrote, would be "tantamount to death". ⇒1917年3月11日〔旧ロシア歴2月26日〕、オクチャブリスト*党員のミハイル・ロヂアンコが、強い指導者の欠如状態についてツァーに電報で説明した。ロヂアンコは、直ちに「国の信頼」のある大臣に就任してもらうよう求めた。遅れは「死に等しい」、と彼は添え書きした。 *Octobrist:「オクチャブリスト」(十月党員)。帝政ロシアの穏健な自由主義政党の党員。

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