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During the night the Germans in a group of houses to the south of the church were mopped up and outside the village a strong point was taken. Early on 29 May the remaining German positions at the church and rectory were captured. French casualties in the final attack were 200, mainly caused by artillery fire. The French attacked into the valley and on 31 May captured Mill Malon, advanced up a communication trench to the sugar refinery and rushed the German garrison, which was overwhelmed as dark fell. At midnight a German counter-attack gradually pushed the French back into the communication trench. A French artillery barrage was arranged and troops on the outskirts of Ablain advanced to the refinery along the stream, as the troops at the communication trench reorganised and attacked again. The Germans were forced back and by the evening of 1 June the position was connected with Ablain by communication trenches (fighting in the area continued sporadically from June–September). From 25 to 28 May French attacks towards Andres failed. D'Urbal continued the limited-objective attacks but transferred the main artillery effort south to Neuville. A three-day preparatory bombardment began on 2 June and on 6 June French infantry captured the main road through the village, as the German garrison replied with massed small-arms fire from cellars and demolished houses. German artillery-fire also caused many French casualties but by 11 June, the French had advanced 500 m (550 yd) on a 330 yd (300 m) front. The British adopted siege warfare tactics of limited attacks prepared by a greater weight of artillery fire, to capture more ground and hold it with fewer casualties. British attacks resumed near Festubert from Port Arthur 850 yd (780 m) north to Rue du Bois, with a night attack by three divisions at 11:30 pm on 15 May, after a three-day bombardment, with 26,000 shells carefully observed on a 5,000 yd (4,600 m) front. The German breastwork was destroyed but many of the machine-gun posts underneath survived, as did infantry dugouts under the second line of breastworks. The attack was limited to an objective about 1,000 yd (910 m) forward along La Quinque Rue road. On the right flank the advance succeeded, a silent advance surprising the surviving Germans in the remains of the breastwork and then capturing the Wohngraben (support trench) before digging in. On the left German return fire stopped the advance in no man's land. An attack at 3:15 a.m. on the right by the 7th Division was successful in parts but with many casualties. Much of the German front line was destroyed and captured but scattered German parties in shell-holes blocked both flanks and prevented a further British advance.

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>During the night the Germans in a group of houses to the south of the church were mopped up and outside the village a strong point was taken. Early on 29 May the remaining German positions at the church and rectory were captured. French casualties in the final attack were 200, mainly caused by artillery fire. The French attacked into the valley and on 31 May captured Mill Malon, advanced up a communication trench to the sugar refinery and rushed the German garrison, which was overwhelmed as dark fell. At midnight a German counter-attack gradually pushed the French back into the communication trench. ⇒夜の間に、教会の南にある家のグループにいたドイツ軍が一掃され、村の外の強化地点が奪取された。5月29日早朝、教会と教区に残っていたドイツ軍陣地が攻略された。最終攻撃でのフランス軍の死傷者は200人で、主に砲撃によるものであった。フランス軍は渓谷に進撃し、5月31日にミル・マロンを攻略し、連絡塹壕沿いに製糖所まで進み、ドイツ軍の守備隊を急襲し、夜の帳が降りたときにこれを蹂躙した。(しかし)真夜中にドイツ軍の反撃が徐々にフランス軍を通信塹壕に押し戻した。 >A French artillery barrage was arranged and troops on the outskirts of Ablain advanced to the refinery along the stream, as the troops at the communication trench reorganised and attacked again. The Germans were forced back and by the evening of 1 June the position was connected with Ablain by communication trenches (fighting in the area continued sporadically from June–September). From 25 to 28 May French attacks towards Andres failed. D'Urbal continued the limited-objective attacks but transferred the main artillery effort south to Neuville. ⇒フランス軍の集中砲火が手配され、アブレン郊外の部隊が川に沿って精糖所の方へ進み、同時に通信塹壕の部隊が再編成して再び攻撃に出た。ドイツ軍は強制退去させられ、6月1日の夕方までに陣地が通信塹壕によってアブレンと繋げられた(この地域での戦闘は6月-9月の間散発的に続いた)。5月25日から28日まで、アンドレに対するフランス軍の攻撃は失敗した。ドゥルバルは限定目的の攻撃を続けたが、主要砲兵隊の取り組みを南のヌヴィーユに移した。 ※この段落、誤訳があるかも知れませんが、その節はどうぞ悪しからず。 >A three-day preparatory bombardment began on 2 June and on 6 June French infantry captured the main road through the village, as the German garrison replied with massed small-arms fire from cellars and demolished houses. German artillery-fire also caused many French casualties but by 11 June, the French had advanced 500 m (550 yd) on a 330 yd (300 m) front. The British adopted siege warfare tactics of limited attacks prepared by a greater weight of artillery fire, to capture more ground and hold it with fewer casualties. ⇒3日間の予備砲撃が6月2日に始まり、6月6日にフランス軍の歩兵隊が村の主要道路を攻略した。ドイツ軍の守備隊が地下室や破壊された家々から大量の小火器で応戦した。ドイツ軍の砲撃はまた、フランス軍に多くの犠牲者を出したが、6月11日までにフランス軍は330ヤード(300メートル)の前線で500メートル(550ヤード)前進した。英国軍は、より多くの土地を攻略し、より少ない犠牲者でそれを保持するために、より大きな砲撃をもって準備した限定的な攻撃の包囲戦術を採用した。 >British attacks resumed near Festubert from Port Arthur 850 yd (780 m) north to Rue du Bois, with a night attack by three divisions at 11:30 pm on 15 May, after a three-day bombardment, with 26,000 shells carefully observed on a 5,000 yd (4,600 m) front. The German breastwork was destroyed but many of the machine-gun posts underneath survived, as did infantry dugouts under the second line of breastworks. The attack was limited to an objective about 1,000 yd (910 m) forward along La Quinque Rue road. ⇒英国の攻撃はアーサー港から850ヤード(780 m)北のボワ通りまでのフェスチュベール近くで再開され、3日間の砲撃の後5月15日の午後11時30分に3個師団による夜間攻撃が行われたが、注意深く見ると5,000ヤード(4,600 m)の前線に対して26,000発もの砲弾が発射された。ドイツ軍の胸壁は破壊されたが、地下の機関銃哨戒基地の多くは生き残った。攻撃は、ラ・キンク通りに沿って前方約1,000ヤード(910 m)の標的に限定された。 >On the right flank the advance succeeded, a silent advance surprising the surviving Germans in the remains of the breastwork and then capturing the Wohngraben (support trench) before digging in. On the left German return fire stopped the advance in no man's land. An attack at 3:15 a.m. on the right by the 7th Division was successful in parts but with many casualties. Much of the German front line was destroyed and captured but scattered German parties in shell-holes blocked both flanks and prevented a further British advance. ⇒右側面では進軍が成功し、静かに前進して胸壁で生き残ったドイツ軍を急襲し、塹壕を掘る前にヴォングラーベン(支持塹壕)を攻略した。左側面ではドイツ軍の反撃砲火によって中間地帯で前進を止められた。第7師団による午前3時15分の右側面への攻撃は部分的に成功したが、多くの犠牲者が出た。ドイツ軍前線の多くは破壊され、攻略されたが、砲弾の穴に散らばったドイツ軍の数個小隊が両側面を阻止し、英国軍のさらなる前進は妨げられた。

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