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Little German resistance was encountered on the right, except from a German pillbox at Egypt House, whence the Guards pulled their right flank back under sniper fire, as they waited for Newfoundland troops of 29th Division to come up. The left brigade bypassed a German strongpoint and reached the final objective, taking the strongpoint later in the afternoon. Consolidation was hampered by German snipers in Houthoulst Forest and German aircraft appeared over the new front line, which was 2,500 yd (2,300 m) forward on the Veldhoek–Vijwegen spur. No counter-attack was made until the evening, beyond the right flank on the 29th Division front, which withdrew a short distance. On the left of the Guards Division, German troops massing at the junction with the French 2nd Division to the north, were dispersed by machine-gun fire from gunners, who had advanced to the final objective with the infantry and by British artillery fire. The French First Army, between the British Fifth Army to the south and the Belgian Army further north, had attacked on 31 July, south of the inundations and advanced to the west of Wydendreft and Bixschoote. On 1 August, the French division on the left flank had captured ground from the Martjevaart and St Jansbeek to Drie Grachten. The axis of the French advance was along the banks of the Corverbeek, towards the south and south-eastern fringes of Houthulst Forest, the villages of Koekuit and Mangelaere and blockhouses and pillboxes, which connected the forest with the German line southwards towards Poelcappelle. On the left flank, the French were covered by the Belgian Army, which held the ground about Knocke and the Yser inundations. On 9 October, the French 2e Division d'Infanterie of I Corps, was to attack towards Houthulst Forest, in conjunction with the British XIV Corps attack on Poelcappelle. The French artillery subjected the German defences east and south-east of Houthulst Forest, to a three-day bombardment. At 5.30 a.m., a creeping-barrage began to move very slowly forwards over a "sea" of mud. The artillery-fire was so effective, that despite an extremely slow infantry advance, the French objectives were reached by 10:00 a.m. with few casualties.

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>Little German resistance was encountered on the right, except from a German pillbox at Egypt House, whence the Guards pulled their right flank back under sniper fire, as they waited for Newfoundland troops of 29th Division to come up. The left brigade bypassed a German strongpoint and reached the final objective, taking the strongpoint later in the afternoon. Consolidation was hampered by German snipers in Houthoulst Forest and German aircraft appeared over the new front line, which was 2,500 yd (2,300 m) forward on the Veldhoek–Vijwegen spur. ⇒右翼ではドイツ軍の小さな抵抗があったが、エジプト・ハウスのドイツ軍ピルボックスは別で、そこからは護衛師団が狙撃兵砲火の保護下に右側面隊を引き戻した。それというのも、第29師団のニューファウンドランド軍が現れるのを待っていたからである。左翼の旅団はドイツ軍の強化地点を迂回して最終標的に到達し、午後遅くにその強化地点を奪取した。フーツールスト森林のドイツ軍狙撃兵によって強化統合が妨げられ、ドイツ軍航空隊が新しい前線の上空に飛来した。それはヴェルデホーク-ヴィウェゲン山脚の2,500ヤード(2,300m)前方であった。 >No counter-attack was made until the evening, beyond the right flank on the 29th Division front, which withdrew a short distance. On the left of the Guards Division, German troops massing at the junction with the French 2nd Division to the north, were dispersed by machine-gun fire from gunners, who had advanced to the final objective with the infantry and by British artillery fire. The French First Army, between the British Fifth Army to the south and the Belgian Army further north, had attacked on 31 July, south of the inundations and advanced to the west of Wydendreft and Bixschoote. ⇒短い距離の撤退をした第29師団前線の右側面を越えた先では、反撃は夕方まで全然なかった。護衛師団の左翼では、北のフランス軍第2師団との接触部でひとかたまりになっていたドイツ軍が、機関銃砲手からの砲火によって分散させられた。フランス第1方面軍は、7月31日に、南の英国軍第5方面軍と、ずっと北のベルギー方面軍との間の冠水地帯南を攻撃し、ウィデンドレフトの西とビショーテ方面に進軍した。 >On 1 August, the French division on the left flank had captured ground from the Martjevaart and St Jansbeek to Drie Grachten. The axis of the French advance was along the banks of the Corverbeek, towards the south and south-eastern fringes of Houthulst Forest, the villages of Koekuit and Mangelaere and blockhouses and pillboxes, which connected the forest with the German line southwards towards Poelcappelle. On the left flank, the French were covered by the Belgian Army, which held the ground about Knocke and the Yser inundations. ⇒8月1日に、左側面のフランス軍師団は、マルチェヴァートやサン・ヤンスベークからドライ・グラフテン(3運河)に通じる地面を攻略した。フランス軍は、進軍の軸としてコルヴァーベークの両岸沿いに南に向かい、フーツールスト森林の南東周辺部、コクイットやマンゲレーレ防塞、およびピルボックスへ進む線をたどった。それは南でポエルカッペル方面までつながるドイツ軍戦線を擁する森林と接続していた。左側面においては、フランス軍は、クノッケとイゼール冠水地の地面を保持するベルギー方面軍の擁護を受けていた。 >On 9 October, the French 2e Division d'Infanterie of I Corps, was to attack towards Houthulst Forest, in conjunction with the British XIV Corps attack on Poelcappelle. The French artillery subjected the German defences east and south-east of Houthulst Forest, to a three-day bombardment. At 5.30 a.m., a creeping-barrage began to move very slowly forwards over a "sea" of mud. The artillery-fire was so effective, that despite an extremely slow infantry advance, the French objectives were reached by 10:00 a.m. with few casualties. ⇒10月9日、フランス軍の第I軍団第2歩兵師団は、ポエルカッペルを攻撃する英国軍第XIV軍団と連携して、フーツールスト森林方面を攻撃することになっていた。フランス軍砲兵隊は、3日間の砲撃でフーツールスト森林の東および南東のドイツ軍守備隊を服従させた。午前5時30分に、纏いつく集中砲火が泥の「海」上で、前方へ極めてゆっくりと移動しはじめた。大砲砲火が非常に効果的であったので、極めて遅い歩兵隊の進軍にもかかわらず、ほとんど死傷者数なしで午前10時までにフランス軍の標的は掌握された。

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