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The 6th Army line from La Bassée to Armentières and Menin, was ordered not to attack until the operations of the new 4th Army in Belgium had begun. Both armies attacked on 20 October, the XIV, VII, XIII and XIX corps of the 6th Army making a general attack from Arras to Armentières. Next day the northern corps of the 6th Army attacked from La Bassée to St Yves and gained little ground but prevented British and French troops from being moved north to Ypres and the Yser fronts. On 27 October, Falkenhayn ordered the 6th Army to move heavy artillery north for the maximum effort due on 29 October at Gheluvelt, to reduce its attacks on the southern flank against II and III corps and to cease offensive operations against the French further south. Armeegruppe von Fabeck was formed from XIII Corps and reinforcements from the armies around Verdun, which further depleted the 6th Army and ended the offensive from La Bassée north to the Lys. On 14 and 15 October, II Corps attacked on both sides of La Bassée Canal and German counter-attacks were made each night. The British managed short advances on the flanks, with help from French cavalry but lost 967 casualties. From 16 to 18 October, II Corps attacks pivoted on the right and the left flank advanced to Aubers, against German opposition at every ditch and bridge, which inflicted another thousand casualties. Givenchy was recaptured by the British on 16 October, Violaines was taken and a foothold established on Aubers Ridge on 17 October; French cavalry captured Fromelles. On 18 October, German resistance increased as the German XIII Corps arrived, reinforced the VII Corps and gradually forced the II Corps to a halt. On 19 October, British infantry and French cavalry captured Le Pilly (Herlies) but were forced to retire by German artillery-fire. The fresh German 13th Division and 14th Division arrived and began to counter-attack against all of the II Corps front. At the end of 20 October, the II Corps was ordered to dig in from the canal near Givenchy, to Violaines, Illies, Herlies and Riez, while offensive operations continued to the north. The countryside was flat, marshy and cut by many streams, which in many places made trench digging impractical, so breastworks built upwards were substituted, despite being conspicuous and easy to demolish with artillery-fire. (It was not until late October that the British received adequate supplies of sandbags and barbed wire.)The British field artillery was allotted to infantry brigades and the 60-pounders and howitzers were reserved for counter-battery fire. The decision to dig in narrowly forestalled a German counter-offensive which began on 20 October, mainly further north against the French XXI Corps and spread south on 21 October, to the 3rd Division area.

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>The 6th Army line ~ and the Yser fronts. ⇒ラ・バセからアルマンティエールやメニンまでの第6方面軍戦線は、新しい第4方面軍の作戦がベルギーで始まるまで攻撃しないよう命じられた。両方面軍とも10月20日に攻撃を始め、第6方面軍の第XIV、第VII、第XIII、第XIX軍団はアラスからアルマンティエールまでの総攻撃を行った。翌日、第6方面軍の北部軍団はラ・バセからサン・イヴまでを攻撃して少しの地面を得たが、英国とフランスの軍隊が北のイープルやイゼールの前線に動かされるのを妨げた。 >On 27 October, Falkenhayn ~ were made each night. ⇒10月27日、ファルケンハインはゲルベルトで最大の戦闘を10月29日にするため、重砲兵隊を北に移動させ、南側面の第II、第III軍団に対する攻撃を減らし、それより南のフランス軍に対する攻撃を中止するよう命令した。第XIII軍団とヴェルドゥン周辺の増援隊からフォン・ファベック方面軍グループが編成されたが、それで第6方面軍が空っぽになり、ラ・バセ北からリィスへの攻勢が終った。10月14日と15日、第II軍団はラ・バセ運河の両岸で襲撃したが、毎夜ごとにドイツ軍の反撃が行われた。 >The British managed short ~ French cavalry captured Fromelles. ⇒英国軍は、フランス軍騎兵隊の助けを借りて、側面で何とか短く進軍したが、英国軍は967人の犠牲者を失った。10月16日から18日にかけて、第II軍団の攻撃が右翼を軸にして左翼隊がオベールに向かって進み、あらゆる塹壕や橋梁で対抗するドイツ軍とわたり合って、さらに1000人の犠牲者を被った。10月16日に英国軍によってジバンシーが再攻略され、10月17日にヴィオレーンが奪取され、オベール・リッジに足場が確立された。フランス軍騎兵隊はフロメーユを攻略した。 >On 18 October, German ~ operations continued to the north. ⇒10月18日、ドイツ第XIII軍団が到着して第VII軍団を強化し、徐々に第II軍団を停止に追い込むにつれて、(かえって)ドイツ軍の抵抗は増大した。10月19日、英国軍歩兵隊とフランス軍騎兵隊がル・ピリー(ヘルリー)を攻略したが、ドイツ軍の砲撃で後退を余儀なくされた。新進(気鋭)のドイツ軍第13師団と第14師団が到着し、第II軍団の前線全体に対して対抗攻撃を始めた。10月20日の終わりに、第II軍団はジバンシー近くの運河からヴィオレーン、イリー、ヘルリー、リエズに向かって塹壕を掘るように命じられ、一方で攻撃的な作戦行動が北へ向かって続いた。 >The countryside was flat, ~ the 3rd Division area. ⇒田園地方は平らな湿地で、多くの流れによって寸断されていた。そして、多くの場所で塹壕掘削が非現実的にされていたので、目立つことによって大砲砲火で破壊するのが簡単であるにもかかわらず、上方へ盛り上げて造られる胸墻に代えられた。(英国軍は10月下旬まで砂袋と有刺鉄線の十分な必需品を受け取ることはなかった。)英国軍野戦砲兵隊は歩兵連隊に割り当てられて、60型ポンド砲と榴弾砲は反撃砲火のために保存された。この塹壕掘削を決定したことで、ドイツ軍の対抗攻勢を辛うじて阻止した。その攻撃は、10月20日、さらに北の、主としてフランス第XXI軍団に向かい、10月21日には南に広がって第3師団地域へ向かった。 ※この段落は誤訳があるかも知れませんが、その節はどうぞ悪しからず。

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    On 24 September, the French advance met a German attack rather than an open flank and by 29 September, having been reinforced to eight corps, the Second Army was still being opposed by German forces near Lille, rather than advancing around an open German northern (right) flank. The 6th Army had also found that on arrival in the north, it was forced to oppose the French, rather than advance around their northern (left) flank and that the secondary objective of protecting the northern flank of the German armies in France had become the main task. By 6 October the French needed British reinforcements to withstand German attacks around Lille. The British Expeditionary Force (BEF) had begun to move from the Aisne to Flanders on 5 October and reinforcements from England assembled on the left flank of the Tenth Army, which had been formed from the left flank units of the Second Army on 4 October. The Allies and the Germans, attempted to take more ground after the "open" northern flank had disappeared, the Franco-British attacks towards Lille in October, being followed up by attempts to advance between the BEF and the Belgian army by a new French Eighth Army. The moves of the 7th and then the 6th Army from Alsace and Lorraine had been intended to secure German lines of communication through Belgium, where the Belgian army had sortied several times during the period between the Franco-British retreat and the Battle of the Marne. In August British marines had landed at Dunkirk and in October a new 4th Army was assembled from the III Reserve Corps and the siege artillery used against Antwerp and four of the new reserve corps training in Germany. The North-east of France and the south-west Belgium were known as Flanders. West of a line between Arras and Calais in the north-west, lay chalk downlands, covered with soil sufficient for arable farming. East of the line, the land declines in a series of spurs into the Flanders plain, bounded by canals linking Douai, Béthune, St. Omer and Calais. To the south-east, canals ran between Lens, Lille, Roubaix and Courtrai, the Lys river from Courtrai to Ghent and to the north-west lay the sea. The plain was almost flat, apart from a line of low hills from Cassel, east to Mont des Cats, Mont Noir, Mont Rouge, Scherpenberg and Mont Kemmel.From Kemmel, a low ridge lay to the north-east, declining in elevation past Ypres, through Wytschaete, Gheluvelt and Passchendaele, curving north and then north-west to Dixmude, where it merged with the plain.

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    Early on 9 October, German troops found some forts of the inner ring empty; Beseler ended the bombardment and summoned the military governor, General Victor Deguise, to surrender. About 30,000 men of the Antwerp garrison surrendered and the city was occupied by German troops. About 33,000 soldiers of the garrison (c. 30 percent of the Belgian Army) fled north to the Netherlands, where they were interned for the duration. During the siege of Antwerp, the German and French armies fought the Battle of the Frontiers (7 August – 13 September) and then the German armies in the north pursued the French and the BEF southwards into France in the Great Retreat, which culminated in the First Battle of the Marne (5–12 September), followed by the First Battle of the Aisne (13–28 September). A series of reciprocal attempts by the Franco-British and German armies to envelop the northern flank of the opposing army, the Race to the Sea took place through Picardy, Artois and Flanders (17 September – 19 October. The "race" ended on the North Sea coast of Belgium, when the last open area from Dixmude to the North Sea was occupied by Belgian troops from Antwerp. British and French forces in Belgium covered the retirement of the Belgians and British from Antwerp. The 1st, 3rd and 4th divisions reached Ostend, the 5th and 6th divisions arrived at Torhout and Diksmuide and the Antwerp garrison troops moved to an area north-west of Ghent. The Germans 4th Ersatz Division and Landwehr troops at Lokeren and Moerbeke turned east towards Ghent before the withdrawal was discovered. The III Reserve Corps and the 4th Ersatz Division were then ordered to turn west and advance on Kortrijk, to prolong the main German front, before being sent towards Ghent and Bruges, with orders to reach Blankenberge and Ostend on the coast. On 11 October, German troops were detected advancing on Ghent, by which time the Belgian fortress troops had joined the field army. A withdrawal from Ghent from 3:00–10:00 p.m. began, after which German troops entered the city. Several bridges were demolished during the retirement, although crowds of civilians on the main road and rail bridges led to them being left intact. Captains of the French Fusiliers marins at the Yser By 18 October, the Belgian, British and French troops in northern France and Belgium had formed a defensive line, with the British II Corps in position, with the 5th Division from La Bassée Canal north to Beau Puits, the 3rd Division from Illies to Aubers and three divisions of the French Cavalry Corps (General Louis Conneau) deployed from Fromelles to Le Maisnil, the British III Corps with the 6th Division from Radinghem to Epinette and the 4th Division from Epinette to Pont Rouge, the BEF Cavalry Corps with the 1st and 2nd Cavalry divisions, from Deûlémont to Tenbrielen, the British IV Corps with the 7th Division and 3rd Cavalry Division from Zandvoorde to Oostnieuwkirke, the French Groupe Bidon and the de Mitry Cavalry Corps from Roulers to Cortemarck, the 87th and 89th Territorial divisions from Passchendaele to Boesinghe and then the Belgian field army and fortress troops from Boesinghe to Nieuport.