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In June 1916, the amount of French artillery at Verdun had been increased to 2,708 guns, including 1,138 × 75 mm field guns; the French and German armies fired c. 10,000,000 shells, with a weight of 1,350,000 long tons (1,370,000 t) from February–December. The German offensive had been contained by French reinforcements, difficulties of terrain and the weather by May, with the 5th Army infantry stuck in tactically dangerous positions, overlooked by the French on the east bank and the west bank, instead of secure on the Meuse Heights. Attrition of the French forces was inflicted by constant infantry attacks, which were vastly more costly than waiting for French counter-attacks and defeating them with artillery. The stalemate was broken by the Brusilov Offensive and the Anglo-French relief offensive on the Somme, which had been expected to lead to the collapse of the Anglo-French armies.

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>In June 1916, the amount of French artillery at Verdun had been increased to 2,708 guns, including 1,138 × 75 mm field guns; the French and German armies fired c. 10,000,000 shells, with a weight of 1,350,000 long tons (1,370,000 t) from February–December. ⇒1916年6月、ヴェルダンにおけるフランス軍の大砲所有量は、2,708門の銃砲(口径75ミリの野戦砲1,138門を含む)に増やされた。フランス方面軍とドイツ方面軍とは、2月から12月までに(合わせて)約10,000,000発の砲弾、重量で1,350,000英トン(1,370,000t)、を発射した。 >The German offensive had been contained by French reinforcements, difficulties of terrain and the weather by May, with the 5th Army infantry stuck in tactically dangerous positions, overlooked by the French on the east bank and the west bank, instead of secure on the Meuse Heights. ⇒ドイツ軍の攻撃は、フランス軍の増援、地形の困難さ、5月までの悪天候などによって抑圧されていた。第5方面軍の歩兵連隊が、ミューズ高地の安全性と引き換えに、東岸と西岸のフランス軍によって見渡されるという、戦術上危険な位置に張りつけられた状況にあったのである。 >Attrition of the French forces was inflicted by constant infantry attacks, which were vastly more costly than waiting for French counter-attacks and defeating them with artillery. The stalemate was broken by the Brusilov Offensive and the Anglo-French relief offensive on the Somme, which had been expected to lead to the collapse of the Anglo-French armies. ⇒(一方)フランス軍は、恒常的な歩兵連隊の出撃によって軍団の消耗(自然減)を負っていたが、それは、フランス軍としては反撃を待ったり、砲撃を浴びせて敵を破るよりも歩兵の出撃のほうが非常に高くついたからである。英仏軍の崩壊に至ることが予期された手詰まり状態は、ソンムのブルシーロフ攻撃と英仏軍救援隊の攻撃によって打開された。

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    Draught animals suffered from the weather, short rations and overloading; the British artillery soon had a shortage of 3,500 horses and several immobilised heavy artillery batteries. The length of the Western Front was reduced by 25 miles (40 km), which needed 13–14 fewer German divisions to hold. The Allied spring offensive had been forestalled and the subsidiary French attack up the Oise valley negated. The main French breakthrough offensive on the Aisne (the Nivelle Offensive), forced the Germans to withdraw to the Hindenburg Line defences behind the existing front line on the Aisne. German counter-attacks became increasingly costly during the battle; after four days 20,000 prisoners had been taken by the French armies and c. 238,000 casualties were inflicted on German armies opposite the French and Belgian fronts between April and July.

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1916年の6月、ヴェルダン(の戦い)でフランス軍の砲の量が銃2708丁に増量されました。これらの内1138丁は75mmの野砲で、フランス軍とドイツ軍は計1350000トンにも及ぶ10000000個の砲弾を2月から12月の間に発射しました。ドイツ攻勢はフランスの応援軍によって抑制され、地形や天気の問題もあり、5月には5番目の歩兵隊は安全なムーズ県の台地ではなく東西の堤防からフランス軍に見降ろされている状態であり、戦術的に危ない立場に置かれていました。フランス軍の摩滅は歩兵隊の不断の攻撃により負わされたものであり、それらはフランス軍の反撃を待って砲で負かすより遥かに犠牲の大きい判断でした。引き分け(暗礁・行き詰まり)の状態はブルシロフ攻勢とアングロフランス(英仏)援助攻勢によりソンム(の戦い)により崩れ、これらはアングロフランス軍の倒壊に繋がるであろうと考えられていました。 というような訳になりましたが、元の文の形状を保ちたかったので逆に日本語がおかしくなっていたらすみません。丁度学校の歴史の授業で習った範囲のことが全て書かれていたのでびっくりしました(≧▽≦)

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