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日本語に訳してください。よろしくお願いします。

どなたか翻訳をしていただけないでしょうか? 宜しくお願いします。 But he is one who has dreams, such dreams, and in a way he is an escapist, he lives two lives, the real world and the world and the landscape inside his head. These are like two pages from the same book. But they never co inside. He has the dismal ability to retreat into dream when life becomes hard and the undesirable tendency to seek to escape problems this way. May have an addictive tendency, that can manifest in thoughts and dreams, or in addictive substances, but both serve the same purpose, it allows him to escape from his problems and to avoid dealing with them and facing up with courage to asserting himself to correct things in his life. It helps him endure what he cannot change. He doesn't like confrontation. He can be evasive, for example agreeable to a thing, then do nothing, which can make him seem deceptive. But it more that he avoids confrontation and difficult action. Cannot always say no, so says yes but then doesn't flow through with the thing he has agreed to. Forgets, avoids, evades, finds a way out that avoid confrontation if he can. Sees it as a sacrifice if he cannot.

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しかし、彼は夢見る人、以下のような夢を見る人です。彼はある意味,現実逃避主義者で、2つの人生、つまり現実の世界と頭の中の情景内の人生を送ります。これは、同じ本の2ページのようです。しかし、それらは決して一致しません*。彼には、何かと夢へ逃げ込む暗い能力があり、人生が苛酷になると、このようにして問題を逃れようとする好ましくない傾向があります。 *誤植と思しきところを、But they never co inside (→coincide).と訂正して訳しました。 彼の習慣には1つの傾向があって、それが彼の考え方や夢に、あるいは習慣実体に現われます。しかしそれは、どちらも同じ目的に適います。問題から逃れて、それと直接関わることを避け、人生において正しい物事を自己主張にするという勇気をもって対処することを可能にします。それは、彼が変えることのできないものに耐えるのを助けます。彼は、対立が好きではないのです。 彼は回避的であり得て、例えば、あることに賛成しているが、何もしないことがあり得ます。そしてそれは、彼をどっちつかずの状態でいることを可能にします。しかしそれは、どちらかと言えば、彼が対立や困難な行動を避けるためなのです。必ずしも常にノーと言うことができないので、その際にはハイと言いますが、それなら、彼が同意したもので溢れてしまうことはありません。彼は、忘れます、避けます、逃れます。そして、彼がそうできれば、対立を避ける出口が見つかる(かもしれない)のです。そうすることができない場合だけ、彼はそれを犠牲とみなします。

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質問者からのお礼

翻訳ありがとうございました! co inside → cocinide なんですね! ずっと謎だったことがわかりすっきりしました(*'ω'*) どうやら性格は内気な感じの方のようですね~。 ありがとうございました!

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