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お願いします (17) Patriotic writers like Livy took great pride in telling about brave Horatius and how he stopped the foreign attackers. Livy knew that the story was exaggerated and that his first-century readers wouldn't completely believe it. But he wasn't telling it to get the facts straight. He told it because it painted a picture of Roman courage at its best. Horatius represented the “true Roman.” (18) Even though Rome had abolished kingship, the Senate had the power to appoint a dictator in times of great danger. This happened in 458 BCE when the Aequi, an Italic tribe living west of Rome, attacked. The Senate sent for Cincinnatus, a farmer who had served as a consul two years earlier. The Senate's messengers found him working in his field and greeted him. They asked him to put on his toga so they might give him an important message from the Senate. Cincinnatus “asked them, in surprise, if all was well, and bade his wife, Racilia, to bring him his toga.... Wiping off the dust and perspiration, he put it on and came forward.” than the messengers congratulated Cincinnatus and told him that he had been appointed dictator of Rome.

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(17) リヴィのような愛国的な作家は、勇敢なホラティウスやどの様にして彼が外国の攻撃者を止めたかについて、誇りをもって語りました。物語に誇張があって、彼の1世紀の読者がそれを完全に信じているわけではないということを、リヴィは知っていました。しかし、彼は、事実を正確に伝えるためにそれを語ってはいませんでした。それがローマ人の勇気がどの様だったかを最高に描いたので、彼はそれを語ったのでした。ホラティウスは「本物のローマ人」を代表していました。 (18) たとえローマが王位を廃止したとしても、元老院には、大変な危機に際して、ディクタトル(独裁官)を任命する権能がありました。このことは、紀元前458年に起こりました、この年、ローマの西に住むイタリック族のイーキーが攻撃してきました。元老院は、2年前に執政官を勤めた農民キンキンナトゥスを呼びにやりました。元老院の使者は、彼が彼の畑で働いているのを見つけると、彼に挨拶しました。元老院からの重要な伝言を彼に与えられるように、使者は、彼にトーガ(男性が公共の場でチュニックの上に着た外衣)を着るよう頼みました。 キンキンナトゥスは「驚いて、万事大丈夫かと彼らに、尋ねました、それから、彼のトーガを持ってくる様に、彼の妻ラシリアに命じまた .... 汚れと汗をふき取ると、彼はそれを身につけて、進み出ました。」、それから、使者は、キンキンナトゥスを祝福して、彼がローマのディクタトル(独裁官)に任命されたことを伝えました。

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