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お願いします (12) No Roman official could be brought to trial while still in office. Tiberius's enemies planned to attack him as soon as his term ended. But he shocked them by announcing his plan to run for re-election. This wasn't supposed to happen. Tribunes were supposed to serve for one year only. Many aristocrats believed that the plebs would soon proclaim Tiberius kind. Would a tyrant once again rule Rome? (13) A brawl broke out in the election assembly and Tiberius was killed in the street fighting that followed. For the first time in centuries, violence had entered Roman politics, and there it stayed until the fall of the Republic. (14) Tiberius had challenged the power of the Senate and won─even though he died in the process. His land reform had become law. A committee soon set to work distributing state-owned lands to the poor. Tiberius's brother Gaius was a member of that committee. In 123 BCE─ten years after Tiberius's death─Gaius followed in his brother's footsteps and was elected tribune. (15) Gaius was a true revolutionary, even more than Tiberius had been. The younger Gracchus was a great orator, and he pushed through some important reforms. His grain law, for example, kept the price of grain low enough that ordinary citizens could afford to buy bread for their families. (16) Like his brother, Gaius fought against the power of the nobles. He changed the jury system so that when senators were tried in the courts for corruption, the jurw would include some men who weren't members of the Senate. This change made it harder for corrupt senators to get away with their crimes. Although Gaius was re-elected, opposition to him grew among Rome's nobility. And like Tiberius, Gaius met his death in a street battle during his second term in office.

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(12) 在任中に、ローマの役人が、裁判にかけられることは、ありませんでした。チベリウスの敵は、彼の任期が終わるとすぐに、彼を攻撃することを計画しました。しかし、彼は、再選に打って出る計画を発表して、彼らに衝撃を与えました。こんなことは、起こるとは思われませんでした。護民官の任期は、1年だけと考えられていました。多くの貴族は、平民が、チベリウスを王であるとすぐにも宣言すると信じました。専制君主が、ローマを再び統治することになるのでしょうか? (13) 乱闘が選挙集会で勃発しました、そして、その後の街路での乱闘で、チベリウスは殺害されました。数世紀ぶりに、暴力が、ローマの政治に入って来ました、そして、この暴力は、共和制の崩壊までローマの政治にとどまりました。 (14) チベリウスは元老院の権限に異議を唱え、勝利しました ─ たとえ彼がその過程で死亡したとしてもです。彼の土地改革は、法律になりました。委員会が、国有地を貧しい者に分配する仕事にすぐにとりかかりました。 チベリウスの弟ガイウスは、その委員会のメンバーでした。チベリウスの死後10年目の ― 紀元前123年に、ガイウスは彼の兄の跡を継いで、護民官に選ばれました。 (15) ガイウスは本物の革命家でした、チベリウスと比べても一層革命家でした。この弟のグラックスは、偉大な雄弁家でした、そして、彼はいくつかの重要な改革を推し進めました。例えば、彼の穀物法は、普通の市民が、ゆとりを持って彼らの家族のためにパンを買えるように穀物の価格を低く維持しました。 (16) 彼の兄と同様、ガイウスは貴族の権力と戦いました。元老院議員が、汚職のかどで裁判にかけられる時、陪審に元老院議員ではない人々を含むように、彼は陪審制度を変えました。この変更は、汚職を犯した元老院議員が、彼らの犯罪から逃れることをより困難にしました。ガイウスは再選されましたが、彼に対する反対はローマの貴族の間で増大しました。そして、チベリウスと同様、 ガイウスは、彼の2度目の任期中に街路での乱闘で彼の死を迎えました。

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