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日本語訳を!!11

お願いします (1) In February of 44 BCE, the Roman Senate declared Julius Caesar dictator of Rome for life. According to the Greek writer Plutarch, the Senate also offered Caesar a crown, but he turned it down. Caesar knew how much Romans had hated the idea of kinds since the reign of Tarquin the Proud, 500 years before. (2) One month later, Julius Caesar was dead, murdered in the Senate. Why? This ancient coin may provide the answer. (3) On it, we see the face of Julius Caesar, a thin, handsome man with fine features, the perfect image of a noble Roman. Caesar himself had ordered the coin to be made, so it probably looks very much like him. He was the first living Roman to be depicted on a coin─by tradition, leaders and heroes received this honor only after their deaths. On the dictator's head is a laurel wreath, a symbol of victory. When Caesar's enemies was this coin, they began to question his plans. Did he intend to become Rome's king after all? Did he plan to set up a monarchy with his children and grandchildren ruling after him? This fear haunted many senators as they watched Caesar's power and popularity grow. (4) Soon after the coin appeared, a group of senators met to plot his murder. (5) In early March, people reported bizarre happenings: strange birds seen in the Forum and odd sounds heard there. Then, when Caesar was sacrificing to the gods, one of the animals was found to have no heart! Many believed that these happenings were omens─warnings of disasters to come.

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(1) 紀元前44年の2月に、ローマの元老院は、ジュリアス・シーザーがローマの終身ディクタトル(独裁官)であると宣言しました。ギリシアの作家プルタークによれば、元老院は、また、シーザーに冠を提供しましたが、彼はそれを断りました。シーザーは、500年前の高慢王タルキンの支配以来その種の考え方をローマの人々が、どれほど憎んできたかを知っていたからでした。 (2) 1ヵ月後、ジュリアス・シーザーは死んでいました、元老院で殺害されたのでした。なぜでしょう?この古代の硬貨が、その答えを提供してくれるかもしれません。 (3) その硬貨には、我々はジュリアス・シーザーの顔を見ることができます、すばらしい顔立ちの、細面の、ハンサムな男性で、高貴なローマ人の申し分のない姿を見せています。シーザー自らが、硬貨の鋳造を命じていました、だから、それは、おそらく彼にとてもよく似ているのでしょう。彼は、硬貨に描かれることになった最初の生きているローマ人でした ― 伝統的には、指導者や英雄は、彼らの死後にのみこの栄誉を受けていました。ディクタトル(独裁官)の頭には、勝利の象徴である月桂樹の花輪が、飾られています。 シーザーの敵がこの硬貨を見た時、彼らは彼の計画を疑い始めました。彼は、結局、ローマの王になるつもりだったのでしょうか?彼は、彼の子供たちや孫たちが、彼の後も支配を行う君主制を打ち立てる計画だったのでしょうか?この恐れは、シーザーの権力と支持が増大するのを目にするにつれ、多くの元老院議員を悩ませました。 (4) 硬貨が登場した後すぐ、一団の元老院議員が、彼の殺害を謀議するために集まりました。 (5) 3月上旬に、人々は奇怪な出来事を報告しました:広場で奇妙な鳥が目撃され、変わった音がそこで聞こえると言うものでした。 それから、シーザーが、神に生贄を捧げているとき、動物の1匹に、心臓がないとわかりました!多くの人々は、これらの出来事が、凶兆 ― 災害がやってくる警告であると信じました。

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