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上手な日本語訳にしてください。

上手な日本語訳にしてください。 ‘’ I couldn’t believe it, ‘’ Sato says. ‘’ The excitement came later, gradually.’’ But at the same time, Sato knew what awaited him after the initial euphoria had subsided. It began immediately, as the seven other players in his group-mostly business associates-gave him \5000 each as a congratulatory gift. To thank them, Sato was supposed to organize a special dinner for them all. Next, he had to give serious thought to what gifts he would present-and to whom-to commemorate his in one.

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  • bakansky
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「信じられない気分だよ」と佐藤は言った。 「じわじわと実感が湧いてくるさ」 そうは言いながらも、初めの高揚した気分が落ち着いた頃が問題だと佐藤は考えていた。 それはすぐに現実になった。同じ職場の同僚たちが、一人5千円づつの祝儀をくれたのである。礼を言って受け取ったものの、その返礼として当然のように宴会の席を設けなければならない。 また、誰に、どのような贈物をするかについても考えなければならない。

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