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お願いします (5) Menenius told the rebels that one time the various parts of this body became angry at the stomach and ganged up against it. They claimed that it was unfair that they should have all the worry, trouble, and work of providing for the belly, while the belly had...nothing to do but enjoy the good things they gave it. So they plotted that the hands should carry no more food to the mouth and that the...teeth would refuse to chew. (6) The body parts meant to punish the belly, but they all grew weak from lack of food. “They finally figured out that the belly had an important job after all. It received nourishment, but it also gave nourishment. It was no idle task to provide the body parts with what they all needed to survive and thrive.” Using this fanciful story, Menenius convinced the workers that their rebellion would be a disaster for everyone, rich and poor alike. Rome needed all of its people. (7) Thanks to Menenius, the workers agreed to go home. But they refused to go back to the status quo. One of the plebs' chief complaints was that the law favored the patricians. And since the courts were in the hands of the rich, a poor person had no protection against an unjust judge. A judge could protect his friends or rule according to his own best interests─whatever was best for him. After the plebs made their stand at the Sacred Mount, the senate voted to give them an assembly of their own and representatives to protect them against injustice. These officials, “tribunes of the plebs,” spoke up for the people and even had the right to veto decrees of the Senate.

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(5) ある時、この身体のいろいろな部分が胃に腹を立て、それに対抗して団結したと、メニーニアスは反乱者に語りました。彼らが、あらゆる心配、苦労、腹に提供する仕事をしているのに、他方、腹は、彼らがそれに与えるおいしいものを楽しむ以外何もしないのは不公平であると、彼らは主張しました。それで、手はどんな食物も口へ運んではならない、そして、歯は、噛むことを拒否することを、彼らは計画しました。 (6) 身体の部位は、腹を罰するつもりでした、しかし、彼らはみんな食物がないために弱くなりました。「彼らは、結局、腹が重要な仕事をしているとようやく理解しました。それは栄養を受け取りますが、それはまた栄養を与えました。身体の部位に彼ら全員が生きて栄えて行くのに必要なものを提供することは、怠け仕事ではなかったのです。」この空想的な物語を使って、メニーニアスは、彼らの反乱が、誰にとっても、富める者にとっても貧しい者にとっても等しく災難であることを労働者に納得させました。ローマは、その民の全てを必要としていたのです。 (7) メニーニアスのおかげで、労働者は家に帰ることに同意しました。しかし、彼らは現状に戻ることを拒否しました。平民の主要な不満の1つは、法律が貴族に味方しているということでした。そして、法廷が金持ちの手の中にあるので、貧しい人は不当な裁判官からの保護を受けられませんでした。裁判官は、彼自身の最大の利益、彼にとって最善のあらゆることに従って、彼の友人を保護したり裁いたりすることができたました。平民が、セイクリッド山で彼らの立場を表明した後、元老院は彼らを不正から保護するために彼らに彼ら自身の集会と代表を与えることを可決しました。これらの(代表の)役人、すなわち、「平民の人権擁護者」は、人々を弁護しました、そして、元老院の命令を拒否する権利さえ持っていました。

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