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Success on the Somme came at a cost which at times seemed to surpass the cost of failure, and for the Australians, Pozières was such a case. As a consequence of being the sole British gain on 23 July, Pozières became a focus of attention for the Germans. Forming as it did a critical element of their defensive system, the German command ordered that it be retaken at all costs. Three attempts were made on 23 July but each was broken up by the British artillery or swept away by machine gun fire. Communication was as difficult for the Germans as it was for the British, and it was not until 7:00 a.m. 24 July that they discovered that Pozières had been captured.

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>Success on the Somme came at a cost which at times seemed to surpass the cost of failure, and for the Australians, Pozières was such a case. As a consequence of being the sole British gain on 23 July, Pozières became a focus of attention for the Germans. Forming as it did a critical element of their defensive system, the German command ordered that it be retaken at all costs. ⇒ソンムでの成功は、時に失敗の場合のコストを凌ぐようなコストを払って手に入れたものだったが、オーストラリア軍にとっては、ポジェールがそのようなケースであった。7月23日の唯一の英国軍の勝利の結果として、ポジェールがドイツ軍にとって注目の焦点になった。それが彼らの防御システムの重要な要素を形成していたので、ドイツ軍司令部は、ぜひとも再奪還するよう命令した。 >Three attempts were made on 23 July but each was broken up by the British artillery or swept away by machine gun fire. Communication was as difficult for the Germans as it was for the British, and it was not until 7:00 a.m. 24 July that they discovered that Pozières had been captured. ⇒それで7月23日に3つの試みがなされたが、そのいずれもが英国砲兵隊によって粉砕されたり、機関銃砲火によって一掃されました。コミュニケーションは、それが英国軍にとって困難だったのと同じくらいドイツ軍にとっても困難であった。それで彼らは、7月24日の午前7時になってようやくポジェールが攻略されたことに気づいた。

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