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The Battle of Wadi, occurring on 13 January 1916, was an unsuccessful attempt by British forces fighting in Mesopotamia (present-day Iraq) during World War I to relieve beleaguered forces under Sir Charles Townshend then under siege by the Ottoman Sixth Army at Kut-al-Amara. Pushed by regional British Commander-in-Chief Sir John Nixon, General Fenton Aylmer launched an attack against Ottoman defensive positions on the banks of the Wadi River. The Wadi was a steep valley of a stream that ran from the north into the River Tigris, some 6 miles (9.7 km) upstream towards Kut-al-Amara from Sheikh Sa'ad. The attack is generally considered as a failure, as although Fenton managed to capture the Wadi, it cost him 1,600 men. The British failure led to Townshend's surrender, along with 10,000 of his men, in the largest single surrender of British troops up to that time. However, the British recaptured Kut in February 1917, on their way to the capture of Baghdad sixteen days later on 11 March 1917.

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以下のとおりお答えします。局地戦にみる英国軍の勝敗を分析しています。 >The Battle of Wadi, occurring on 13 January 1916, was an unsuccessful attempt by British forces fighting in Mesopotamia (present-day Iraq) during World War I to relieve beleaguered forces under Sir Charles Townshend then under siege by the Ottoman Sixth Army at Kut-al-Amara. ⇒第一次世界大戦の間メソポタミア(現代のイラク)で戦っていた英国軍によって、1916年1月13日に起こされたワジの戦いは、チャールズ・タウンゼンド卿指揮下にクツ-アル-アマラで包囲され、続いてオスマントルコ第6方面軍による包囲攻撃下にあった軍隊を救うためであったが、不成功な試みであった。 >Pushed by regional British Commander-in-Chief Sir John Nixon, General Fenton Aylmer launched an attack against Ottoman defensive positions on the banks of the Wadi River. The Wadi was a steep valley of a stream that ran from the north into the River Tigris, some 6 miles (9.7 km) upstream towards Kut-al-Amara from Sheikh Sa'ad. ⇒地域の英国総司令官ジョン・ニクソン卿に背中を押されて、フェントン・エールマー将軍がワジ川土手のオスマントルコ防御陣地への攻撃を開始した。ワジは、北からチグリス川に流れ込む小川の急勾配の谷間で、シェイク・サアドからクツ-アル-アマラへ向かって約6マイル(9.7km)の上流であった。 >The attack is generally considered as a failure, as although Fenton managed to capture the Wadi, it cost him 1,600 men. The British failure led to Townshend's surrender, along with 10,000 of his men, in the largest single surrender of British troops up to that time. However, the British recaptured Kut in February 1917, on their way to the capture of Baghdad sixteen days later on 11 March 1917. ⇒フェントンはどうにかしてワジを攻略したが、1,600人の兵士の犠牲が見積もられるので、その攻撃は一般に失敗であったとみなされている。英国軍のその失敗は、10,000人の所属兵士を引き連れたタウンゼンドの降伏につながったが、それは英国軍にとってはその時までで最も大きな単独降伏であった。とはいえ、英国軍は1917年2月にクツを奪回したのであって、それは、その16日後1917年3月11日のバグダッド攻略の途中であった。

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