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お願いします (7) But now the battle moved to the Mediterranean. Egypt was not known for having much of a navy. Its navy was essentially the army with a little training at sea. Egyptians hated the sea―or the "Great Green" as they called it. Now they must fight the Sea Peoples on the Great Green. (8) From the text inscribed at Ramesses III's mortuary temple, we know that the Sea Peoples "penetrated the channels of the Nile Mouths" and that Ramesses III attacked "like a whirlwind against them." Although the Egyptian seamen were not as skilled as the Sea Peoples, their boats had oars―not just sails like the Sea Peoples' vessels. On open waters the Egyptian navy wouldn't have had a chance, but in the confined river mouths they could maneuver using oars. The Egyptian warships herded the Sea Peoples' boats closer and closer to land, where Ramesses III had lined the shore with archers. When the enemy ships were forced within firing range, the Egyptian archers let go volley after volley of arrows. The air filled with the hiss of their flight and the thwack of their landing. Egyptian marine archers joined the land archers firing from the boat decks in unison. Arrows fell like rain on the Sea Peoples who, armed with only swords and spears, cowered helplessly.

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(7) しかし、今や、戦闘は地中海へ移りました。 エジプトは、海軍に関してはあまり有名ではありません。 その海軍は、基本的に海上訓練を少し受けた陸軍でした。 エジプト人は、海 ― 彼ら風に呼べば「大いなる緑」を嫌いました。 今や、彼らは大いなる緑の上で海の民と戦わなければなりません。 (8) ラムセス3世が埋葬された神殿に刻まれた文章から、海の民が「ナイル川河口のいくつかの水路を突破した」こと、そして、ラムセス3世が、「疾風のごとく彼らを攻撃した」ことが、我々には分かります。 エジプトの船乗りは、海の民ほど熟練していませんでしたが、彼らの船にはオールが付いていました ― 海の民の船の様に帆だけではなかったのです。広々とした海では、エジプト海軍には勝ち目はなかったでしょう、しかし、狭い河口では、彼らはオールを用いて操作することができました。 エジプトの軍艦は、海の民の船を陸地の方へとどんどん追い込みました、陸地では、ラムセス3世が、弓術部隊を岸に並べていました。 敵の船が射程距離に追い込まれた時、エジプトの弓術部隊は、矢の一斉射撃を繰り返し行いました。大気は、矢が飛ぶときのシュッと言う音と、それらが突き刺さった時のブスッと言う音で満たされました。 エジプト海軍の弓術部隊が陸上の弓術部隊に加わり船の甲板から一斉に矢を射ました。 矢が海の民に雨の様に降り注ぎました、彼らは、剣と槍だけの武装だったので、どうすることもできず萎縮しました。

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  • 日本語訳を!

    お願いします (9) The Egyptian seamen used their oars to maneuver the warships even closer. They tossed grappling hooks into the Sea Peoples' vessels. When the hooks took hold the Egyptians heaved on the lines and capsized the Sea Peoples' boats. As they tumbled into the water they were "butchered and their corpses hacked up." Others were grabbed, chained, and taken prisoner before they could swim to shore. (10) In the victory scene at the mortuary temple, we see a pile of severed hands presented to Ramesses III. Prisoners taken alive were branded and assigned to labor forces. The vizier counted everything―hands, spoils, prisoners―for an official report. Ma'at had conquered chaos. The battle against the Sea Peoples had been won. "Their hearts and their souls are finished for all eternity. Their weapons are scattered in the sea."

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    お願いします (4) Ramesses III's inscription tells us that he raced with his army toward southern Palestine to stop the Sea Peoples before they stepped on Egyptian soil. Every ship was sent to the mouth of the Nile, until Ramesses III had filled "the harbor-mouths, like a strong wall, with warships, galleys and barges." Ramesses III knew that he must draw a defensive line. The Egyptians believed this enemy had toppled empires. Egypt would not be one of them. He spared nothing outfitting his fleet. "They were manned completely from bow to stern with valiant warriors bearing their arms, soldiers of the choicest of Egypt..." Along the shore, Ramesses III positioned charioteers. "Their horses were quivering in their every limb, ready to crush the countries under their feet." (5) The Sea Peoples approached from the northeast. They came in waves. A vast horde advanced by land, a massive fleet bore down by sea―all headed straight for Egypt. Thousands marched―young, old, families with wagons piled high with their belongings pulled by humpbacked oxen, soldiers in chariots, soldiers on foot―driven by the common goal of claiming Egypt's prosperous land for their own. (6) The first wave of Sea People attacked by land. From the scenes drawn at Ramesses III's mortuary temple, we see the chaotic mass of enemy soldiers as they launched themselves at the Egyptians. Some wore horned helmets. Others wore feathered helmets. Charioteers, three to a chariot, forced their horses into the fray. Swordsmen charged, slashing long, tapered swords. The infantry thrust their javelins and spears. Against them Ramesses III stood firm. King, chariot, and horses are shown in perfect alignment whereas the Sea Peoples are a chaotic jumble, facing slaughter, surrender, or flight. Ramesses III's troops fought with chins raised and lips pressed together in grim determination. The Sea Peoples scattered. Their soldiers turned and fled.

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