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お願いします (9) The Egyptian seamen used their oars to maneuver the warships even closer. They tossed grappling hooks into the Sea Peoples' vessels. When the hooks took hold the Egyptians heaved on the lines and capsized the Sea Peoples' boats. As they tumbled into the water they were "butchered and their corpses hacked up." Others were grabbed, chained, and taken prisoner before they could swim to shore. (10) In the victory scene at the mortuary temple, we see a pile of severed hands presented to Ramesses III. Prisoners taken alive were branded and assigned to labor forces. The vizier counted everything―hands, spoils, prisoners―for an official report. Ma'at had conquered chaos. The battle against the Sea Peoples had been won. "Their hearts and their souls are finished for all eternity. Their weapons are scattered in the sea."

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(9) エジプトの船乗りは、彼らのオールを使って、軍艦をさらに接近させました。 彼らは、引っ掛け鉤を海の民の船に投げ込みました。 鉤が引っ掛かると、エジプト人はロープを引っ張って、海の民の船を転覆させました。 彼らが水の中に落ちると、彼らは「虐殺され、彼らの死体はめった切りにされました。」 岸に泳ぎ着けない内に、捕まり、鎖につながれ、捕虜となるものもいました。 (10) (ラムセス3世が)埋葬された神殿の勝利の場面では、我々は大量の切断された手がラムセス3世に提出されるのが見えます。 生け捕りにされた捕虜は、焼印を押されて、苦役をさせられました。 主席大臣は、手、戦利品、捕虜 ― すべてを公式報告書のために数えました。マアト(真理、均衡、秩序、法、道徳、正義と言った古代エジプトの概念)が混沌を征服しました。 海の民との戦いは、勝利に終わりました。 「彼らの心、彼らの魂は、永遠に終わりを告げた。 彼らの武器は、散り散りになり海の藻屑となった。」

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