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日本語訳を!(10)

お願いします (1) The invaders didn't swoop across Egypt like a tidal wave. At the beginning of the Second Intermediate Peiod, they trickled in―immigrants from the east settling into the delta of northern Egypt. We call the invaders the Hyksos. Soon so many Hyksos had moved into the delta that they had their own king―and that irritated the king of Egypt. This as Egyptian soil, after all. Who did that foreign king think he was ruling in Egypt? No matter how hard the Hyksos tried to blend in, they were still foreigners. It didn't matter if they worshipped Egyptian gods, wore Egyptian clothes, or ate Egyptian food. They were still foreigners. Even their Egyptian name, heqa-khasut, smacked of somewhere else. It meant "chiefs of foreign lands." (2) True, the Hyksos brought with them the hump-backed Zebu cattle that the Egyptians liked so much. And those apples sure were tasty...not to mention the olives. And oh, the sound of the lyre and the lute! Their notes echoed through the chambers of the royal palace. Then there was the vertical loom. For weaving linen it couldn't be beat. The Hyksos' potter's wheels were better, too. But why were the Hyksos hiring scribes to copy Egyptian texts? Stealing Egyptian medical practices, no doubt. And it was totally unacceptable to build Avaris, a walled fortree, and claim it as their capital. (3) Manetho, an Egyptian priest, writes that the Hyksos' king "found a city very favorably situated on the east of the...Nile, and called it Avaris. This place he rebuilt and fortified with massive walls, planting there a garrison of as many as 240,000 heavy-armed men to guard his frontier." Nowhere did the Hyksos' foreignness offend Egyptians as much as at Avaris. Why, those Hyksos dared to live in the same place that they buried their dead. Barbarians!

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(1) 侵入者は、津波のようにエジプト全域を襲うわけではありませんでした。 第2中間期の初めに、彼らは、少しずつ侵入してきました ― 北エジプトのデルタに定住するようにたった東からの移民でした。 我々は、侵入者をヒクソスと呼びます。 間もなく、とても多くのヒクソス人が、デルタに移住してきて、彼らには、彼ら自身の王もいました ― そして、そのことは、エジプトの王をいらいらさせました。結局、ここは、エジプトの土地でした。 その外国の王は、彼がエジプトで誰を支配していると思っていたのでしょうか? ヒクソスの民がどんなに一生懸命に溶け込もうとしたとしても、彼らはまだ外国人でした。 彼らがエジプトの神に礼拝し、エジプトの衣服を身に着け、エジプトの食物を食べたとしても、それは重要ではありませんでした。彼らは、まだ異邦人だったのです。 彼らのエジプトの名前、ヘカ・カーストでさえ、どこかよその土地を思わせました。 それは、「異国の主」を意味しました。 (2) 確かに、ヒクソス人は、エジプト人が大好きな背中にコブのあるコブ牛を彼らと共に連れてきました。 そして、それらのリンゴは、確かにおいしかったです ... オリーブは、言うまでもないことでした。そして、ああ、リラ(竪琴)とリュート(ギターに似た楽器)の音! 彼らの音楽が、王宮の至る所の部屋でこだましました。 それから、垂直の織機がありました。 リネンを織るために、それに勝るものはありませんでした。 ヒクソス人の陶工ろくろも、より優れていました。 しかし、なぜ、ヒクソス人はエジプトの文書を写すために書記を雇っていたのでしょうか?間違いなく、エジプトの医術を盗むことでした。 そして、壁に囲まれた砦のアバリスを造って、それが彼らの都であると主張することは、全く受け入れがたいことでした。 (3) エジプトの神官、マネトは次の様に書いています、ヒクソスの王が「街が、ナイル川の東の非常に良い位置にあると思い、そこをアバリスと呼んだ。この地を、彼は、作り直し、巨大な壁で砦とし、彼の辺境の地を守るために240,000人もの重武装の兵士から成る駐屯軍をそこに駐留させた。」 アバリスほど、ヒクソス人の異質性がエジプト人を憤慨させる場所はありませんでした。 何故、それらのヒクソス人は、彼らが死者を葬る同じ場所にあえて住むことにしたのでしょうか。 野蛮人め!

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    お願いします (4) The king of the Hyksos was like a pebble in the Egyptian king's sandal. He irritated him just by being there, but war didn't break out until the insult. The Hyksos king sent a message to the ruler of Egypt, King Seqenenre. The Hyksos king complained that King Seqenenre's hippos in the royal pools "were keeping him awake at night with their grunts." Do something, he demanded. Given that Avaris was hundreds of miles from Thebes, where the king and his hippos lived, this was nothing short of a slap in the face. King Seqenenre was furious. Although it is unknown what happened next, the damage to King Seqenenre's skull indicates it didn't turn out well for the Egyptian side. During that time kings commanded the armies and led the soldiers into battle. Archaeologists have identified King Seqenenre's head, and it's not pretty. He took a battle axe to the forehead and was stabbed in the neck after he fell to the ground. This attack was the beginning of a war that would last nearly 25 years, from about 1574 to 1550 BCE, and span the reign of three Egyptian kings. (5) The Egyptians were farmers, not warriors. They were peaceful people. They were not conquerors by nature. And nowhere was that more obvious than in their army. It was unorganized. The soldiers served part-time and their weapons were not much more than farm tools adapted for battle. The few full-time soldiers were trained as palace guards, border police, or trade-ship escorts―not warriors. For the occasional battle outside of Egypt, the king hired foreign mercenaries because Egyptians didn't want to die away from home. An improper burial meant wandering the desert for eternity―not a pleasant haunting.

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