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緊急!! 和訳お願いします。

挑戦はしてみたもののわかりません。 和訳 お願いしますm(_ _)m And, finally, the patients generally knew their diagnoses, and they might mention it, particularly if you walked in, sat down, and said heartily,"Well, how're you feeling today, Mr.Jones?" "Much better today." "What have the doctors told you about your illness?" "Just that it's peptic ulcer." But even if the patients didn't know their diagnoses, in a teaching hospital they had all been interviewed so many time before that you could tell how you were doing by watching their responses. If you were on the right track, they'd sigh and say,"Everybody asks me about pain after meals," or "Everybody asks me about the color of my stools." But if you were off track, they'd complain, "Why are you asking me this? Nobody else has asked this." So you often had the sense of following a well-worn path. "Go see Mr.Carey in room six; he has a good story for glomerulonephritis," the resident said. My elation at being told the diagnosis was immediately tempered:"Infact, the guy's probably going to die." Mr. Carey was a young man of twenty-four, sitting up in bed, playing solitaire. He seemed healthy and cheerful. In fact, the was so friendly I wondered why nobody ever seemed to go into his room. Mr.Carey worked as a gardener on an estate outside Boston. His story was that he had had a bad sore throat a few months before; he had seen a doctor and had been given pills for a strep throat, but he hadn'd taken the pills for more than a few days. Some time later he noticed swelling in his body and he felt weak. He laterlearned he had some disease of his kidneys. Now he had to be dialyzed on kidney machines twice a week. The doctors had said something about a kidney transplant, but he wasn't sure. Meanwhile, he waited. That was what he was doing now, waiting.

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    で、ついには患者は病名を知ることになる。とくに病室に入り、腰掛けるなり、快活に「どう、ジョーンズさん、今日の気分は」と言うと(患者は)病名を言うかもしれない。     「きょう、気分はずっとよくなりました」     「で病気について医者は何といいました?」     「ただ胃潰瘍だと」     しかし患者が病名を知らないときでも、実習病院ではみんな何度も診察を受けているので、患者の反応を見れば自分の質問が、みんながするのと同じ質問かどうかが分かる。 他と同じなら患者は溜め息をついて「誰も食後に痛みがあるか、と聞く」とか「糞の色を尋ねる」と言う。しかし外れていると「なぜそんなことを聞くのか、誰もそんなことは聞かなかった」と不平を言う。     こうして先人が踏み固めた道がどんなものかが分かる。     「6号室のケアリーさんに聞いてご覧、糸球体腎炎について面白い話が聞けるよ」と研修医が言った。    病名を知らされて私は一瞬うれしかったがそれも「彼は多分長くないよ」と聞くまでの束の間だった。    ケアリーさんは、24歳の若者だった、ベッドに座り、ソリティア(一人で遊ぶトランプゲーム)をやっていた。健康で元気そうだった。     実のところ彼は非常に人付き合いがよく、どうして誰も彼の部屋に行かないのか不思議だった。     彼はボストン郊外のあるお屋敷の庭師として働いていた。彼の話では数ヶ月にわたって喉が非常に痛い時期があり、医者に連鎖球菌性喉頭炎の錠剤をもらったが、数日間しか服用しなかった。     その後しばらくして身体が腫れているのに気づき、けだるさを覚えた。その後何らかの腎臓の病気であると知らされた。今では週2回機械で透析をしなくてはならない。医者は腎臓移植について何か言ったような気がする、と彼は言う。    今のところ彼は待っている。    今彼がやっていることは、待っていることだ。

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