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France had decided to govern Syria directly, and took action to enforce the French Mandate of Syria before the terms had been accepted by the Council of the League of Nations. The French issued an ultimatum and intervened militarily at the Battle of Maysalun in June 1920. They deposed the indigenous Arab government, and removed King Faisal from Damascus in August 1920. Great Britain also appointed a High Commissioner and established their own mandatory regime in Palestine, without first obtaining approval from the Council of the League of Nations, or obtaining the formal cession of the territory from the former sovereign, Turkey. Attempts to explain the conduct of the Allies were made at the San Remo conference and in the Churchill White Paper of 1922. The White Paper stated the British position that Palestine was part of the excluded areas of "Syria lying to the west of the District of Damascus".

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以下のとおりお答えします。 アラブ地域での英仏の統治権問題を述べています。 >France had decided to govern Syria directly, and took action to enforce the French Mandate of Syria before the terms had been accepted by the Council of the League of Nations. The French issued an ultimatum and intervened militarily at the Battle of Maysalun in June 1920. ⇒フランスは、シリアを直接統治することに決めて、その条文が国際連盟の会議に受け入れられるより前にシリアに対するフランスの委任を実施するための行動を起こした。フランス人は最後通告を出して、1920年6月「メイサルンの局地戦」で、軍事介入した。 >They deposed the indigenous Arab government, and removed King Faisal from Damascus in August 1920. Great Britain also appointed a High Commissioner and established their own mandatory regime in Palestine, without first obtaining approval from the Council of the League of Nations, or obtaining the formal cession of the territory from the former sovereign, Turkey. ⇒彼らは土着のアラブ政府を退けて、1920年8月にダマスカスのファイサル王を解任した。英国も、高等弁務官を任命して、前もって国際連盟の会議から承認を得ることも、前支配者(トルコ)から領土の正式な譲渡を得ることなしにパレスチナで彼ら自身の支配体制を設立した。 >Attempts to explain the conduct of the Allies were made at the San Remo conference and in the Churchill White Paper* of 1922. The White Paper stated the British position that Palestine was part of the excluded areas of "Syria lying to the west of the District of Damascus". ⇒連合国の行動方針を説明する試みは、サン・レモ会議および1922年のチャーチル白書*でなされた。白書は、パレスチナが「ダマスカス地区の西方に存在するシリア」という除外地域の一部であった、という英国の見解を述べた。 *Churchill White Paper「チャーチル白書」:いわゆる「パレスチナ問題」における英国の委任統治権とバルフォア宣言を確認するための報告である(先行して発布されたマクマホン宣言との食い違いによる混乱があった)。なお、この白書の正式名は、The British White Paper of 1922「1922年英国白書」。

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フランスはシリア支配を決定した。国際連盟の理事会が承認する前に、シリアにおけるフランス統治の強化を行った。フランスは最後通告(最後通牒)を出して1920年6月のメイサルンの戦いから武力介入を行った。フランスは、アラブ先住民政府を退陣させ、1920年8月にはダマスカスからファイサル国王を追放した。 大英帝国もまた高等弁務官(総督)を任命し、国際連盟の理事会承認を得ずにパレスチナの権益支配を確立した。また、それは前統治国のトルコからの事実上の領土割譲であった。 連合国の行為を説明しようとする試みは、1922年のサンレモ会議とチャーチル白書により行われた。白書は、パレスチナが「ダマスカス西側のシリア」の除外地域の一部であるとの英国の立場を述べた。 【補足】High Commissioner  植民地に置く総督 または 大使(英国連邦内)または 国連高等弁務官ですが、詳細を知りませんので高等弁務官(総督)としました。

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