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Lord Grey had been the Foreign Secretary during the McMahon–Hussein negotiations. Speaking in the House of Lords on 27 March 1923, he made it clear that, for his part, he entertained serious doubts as to the validity of the British Government's (Churchill's) interpretation of the pledges which he, as Foreign Secretary, had caused to be given to the Sharif Hussein in 1915. He called for all of the secret engagements regarding Palestine to be made public. Many of the relevant documents in the National Archives were later declassified and published. Among them were various assurances of Arab independence provided by Secretary of War, Lord Kitchener, the Viceroy of India, and others in the War Cabinet. The minutes of a Cabinet Eastern Committee meeting, chaired by Lord Curzon, held on 5 December 1918 to discuss the various Palestine undertakings makes it clear that Palestine had not been excluded from the agreement with Hussein. General Jan Smuts, Lord Balfour, Lord Robert Cecil, General Sir Henry Wilson, Chief of the Imperial General Staff, and representatives of the Foreign Office, the India Office, the Admiralty, the War Office, and the Treasury were present. T. E. Lawrence also attended. According to the minutes Lord Curzon explained:

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以下のとおりお答えします。 「パレスチナ問題」の発端や経緯をたどっています。 >Lord Grey had been the Foreign Secretary during the McMahon–Hussein negotiations. Speaking in the House of Lords on 27 March 1923, he made it clear that, for his part, he entertained serious doubts as to the validity of the British Government's (Churchill's) interpretation of the pledges which he, as Foreign Secretary, had caused to be given to the Sharif Hussein in 1915. He called for all of the secret engagements regarding Palestine to be made public. ⇒グレー卿は、マクマホン–フセイン交渉の時期の外務大臣であった。彼は、1923年3月27日に上院で演説して、(担当の)外務大臣として、1915年にシャリフ・フセインに与えられる原因となった誓約に関する、英国政府の(つまり、チャーチルの)解釈の有効性について、彼の立場から重大な疑いを抱いていることを明らかにした。彼は、パレスチナに関する密約の秘密文書をすべて公表するよう求めた。 >Many of the relevant documents in the National Archives were later declassified and published. Among them were various assurances of Arab independence provided by Secretary of War, Lord Kitchener, the Viceroy of India, and others in the War Cabinet. The minutes of a Cabinet Eastern Committee meeting, chaired by Lord Curzon, held on 5 December 1918 to discuss the various Palestine undertakings makes it clear that Palestine had not been excluded from the agreement with Hussein. ⇒国立公文書館の関連文書の多くは、後に機密扱いを解かれて公開された。その中には、戦争大臣、キッチナー卿、インド総督、戦争内閣らによって提供されたアラブ独立に関わる各種の保証条項があった。カーズン卿が議長を務め、1918年12月5日にパレスチナをめぐる各種の企てを議論すべく俎上に乗った内閣東部委員会会議の議事録によって、パレスチナはフセインとの契約から除外されていなかったことが明らかになった。 >General Jan Smuts, Lord Balfour, Lord Robert Cecil, General Sir Henry Wilson, Chief of the Imperial General Staff, and representatives of the Foreign Office, the India Office, the Admiralty, the War Office, and the Treasury were present. T. E. Lawrence also attended. According to the minutes Lord Curzon explained: ⇒(その会議には)ジャン・スマッツ将軍、バルフォア卿、ロバート・セシル卿、ヘンリー・ウィルソン卿将軍、参謀本部総長、それと外務省、インド局、海軍本部、陸軍省、財務省の各代表が出席していた。T. E.ローレンスも列席していた。カーズン卿が説明した議事録によると:(「パレスチナの地位はこうだった。」…)

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