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Eastern Force had 170 guns, 16 of which were of medium or larger calibre. With the arrival of railhead at Deir el Belah on 5 April, more medium artillery was transported forward. These included all 12 of the 60-pounder guns, the 201st Siege Battery of two 8-inch and 6-inch howitzers and the third brigades of the 53rd (Welsh) and the 54th (East Anglian) Division's field artillery, and represented the only additional artillery received between the first and second battles. By 18 April all heavy guns had been registered on their targets by artillery aircraft flying up and down the line, marking every flash. A detachment of eight heavy Mark I tanks from the Tank Corps (also known as Heavy Section, Machine Gun Corps) reached the front. Tanks had been in use in France since September 1916 and Palestine was to be the only other theatre of the war they were employed. They "seemed to offer the best chance of a successful frontal assault." Lyden-Bell reported to the War Office that they would frighten the defenders "out of their lives." Senior officers apparently deployed them for this purpose in widely separated pairs. The tanks which arrived in Palestine in January 1917 had been used for instruction and were not of the latest type, however during a trial attack they proved themselves in the sandy conditions. " he sand though fairly heavy, did not interfere with them in the least. They buzzed along most satisfactorily." They worked well in sand so long as the treads were not greased, which was the normal practice.

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>Eastern Force had 170 guns, 16 of which were of medium or larger calibre. With the arrival of railhead at Deir el Belah on 5 April, more medium artillery was transported forward. These included all 12 of the 60-pounder guns, the 201st Siege Battery of two 8-inch and 6-inch howitzers and the third brigades of the 53rd (Welsh) and the 54th (East Anglian) Division's field artillery, and represented the only additional artillery received between the first and second battles. By 18 April all heavy guns had been registered on their targets by artillery aircraft flying up and down the line, marking every flash. ⇒東部軍団は、170門の銃砲を持っていて、そのうちの16門は中間以上の口径のものであった。4月5日、鉄道線路の末端(兵站駅)がデイル・エル・ベラフまで届いたので、中程度の大砲がさらに前線に輸送された。これらは全12門の60型ポンド砲、第201包囲中隊所有の8インチ、6インチ2門の榴弾砲、第53(ウェールズ)、第54(東アングル)師団の第3旅団所有の野戦砲などを含んでいたが、これが唯一第1、第2回の戦いの間で受け取られた追加の大砲であることを示した。4月18日までには、すべての重砲が大砲航空機で目的の戦線まで飛来して登録され、あらゆる砲火のフラッシュを記録している。 ※この部分(特に後半)はよく分かりませんでした。誤訳があるかも知れませんが、その節はどうぞ悪しからず。 >A detachment of eight heavy Mark I tanks* from the Tank Corps (also known as Heavy Section, Machine Gun Corps) reached the front. Tanks had been in use in France since September 1916 and Palestine was to be the only other theatre of the war they were employed. They "seemed to offer the best chance of a successful frontal assault." Lyden-Bell reported to the War Office that they would frighten the defenders "out of their lives." Senior officers apparently deployed them for this purpose in widely separated pairs. ⇒「戦車部隊」(「重火器班、機関銃部隊」としても知られる)から8台の重い「マークI型戦車」*の分遣隊が前線に着いた。戦車は、1916年9月以来フランスで使用されていたが、パレスチナはそれ以外の地で用いられた唯一の戦争現場ということになった。それらは、「前線の攻撃で最高の成功への可能性を提供するようであった」。それは「命が縮むほどに」守備隊を怖がらせる、とライデン‐ベルは陸軍省に報告した。上官らは、明らかにこの目的のために、それらを広く離れた組みにして展開した。 *Mark I tanks「マークI型戦車」:第一次世界大戦最中英国で誕生した世界初の近代的な実用戦車。1916年9月15日「ソンムの戦い」で初めて戦闘に投入された。後に改良を加えたマークII・III・IV型などが開発された。 >The tanks which arrived in Palestine in January 1917 had been used for instruction and were not of the latest type, however during a trial attack they proved themselves in the sandy conditions. " he → (The) sand though fairly heavy, did not interfere with them in the least. They buzzed along most satisfactorily." They worked well in sand so long as the treads were not greased, which was the normal practice. ⇒しかし、1917年1月にパレスチナに着いた戦車を指導のために使ったが、それは最新のタイプではなかった。けれども、砂地の状況で試験攻撃をしてみると、それは力量のあることが判明した。「砂地はかなり重いけれども、少しも邪魔にはなりませんでした。それは極めて満足そうにブンブン音を立てながら進みました」。(確かに)それは、通常の実践で、トレッド(接地面)に油がつかない限り、砂地でうまく動いたのである。

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