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"The Palestine position is this. If we deal with our commitments, there is first the general pledge to Hussein in October 1915, under which Palestine was included in the areas as to which Great Britain pledged itself that they should be Arab and independent in the future ... Great Britain and France – Italy subsequently agreeing—committed themselves to an international administration of Palestine in consultation with Russia, who was an ally at that time ... A new feature was brought into the case in November 1917, when Mr Balfour, with the authority of the War Cabinet, issued his famous declaration to the Zionists that Palestine 'should be the national home of the Jewish people, but that nothing should be done—and this, of course, was a most important proviso—to prejudice the civil and religious rights of the existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine. Those, as far as I know, are the only actual engagements into which we entered with regard to Palestine."

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以下のとおりお答えします。 カーズン卿が説明する『バルフォア宣言』(の舞台裏)です。 >"The Palestine position is this. If we deal with our commitments, there is first the general pledge to Hussein in October 1915, under which Palestine was included in the areas as to which Great Britain pledged itself that they should be Arab and independent in the future ... Great Britain and France – Italy subsequently agreeing—committed themselves to an international administration of Palestine in consultation with Russia, who was an ally at that time ... ⇒「パレスチナの地位はこうです。我々の関与したことを扱うならば、まず、1915年10月のフセインに対する一般誓約があります。そしてその下で、パレスチナは、将来彼らがアラブそのものであるはずで、独立していなければならない、と英国自体が誓った地域に含まれていました…。英国とフランス ― その後イタリアが同意する ― が当時盟友であったロシアと協議して、己自身をパレスチナの国際管理者に任じました…。 >A new feature was brought into the case in November 1917, when Mr Balfour, with the authority of the War Cabinet, issued his famous declaration to the Zionists that Palestine 'should be the national home of the Jewish people, but that nothing should be done—and this, of course, was a most important proviso—to prejudice the civil and religious rights of the existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine. Those, as far as I know, are the only actual engagements into which we entered with regard to Palestine." ⇒新しい特徴が、1917年11月、本件に持ち込まれました。その時バルフォア氏が、戦争内閣の認可を得て、パレスチナは、『ユダヤ民族の本国でなければならないが、パレスチナに存在する非ユダヤ人共同体の公民権や宗教的な権利を害するようなことは何ごとも ― もちろんこれが、最も重要な但し書きであった ― なされてはならない』、という有名な宣言をシオニスト宛に発布しました。それらは、私の知る限り、我々がパレスチナに関して申し出た唯一実際の約束です。」

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