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As the Allied operations in the Middle East were secondary to the Western Front campaign, reinforcements requested by General Sir Archibald Murray, commander of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF), were denied. Further, on 11 January 1917, the War Cabinet informed Murray that large scale operations in Palestine were to be deferred until September, and he was informed by Field Marshal William Robertson, the Chief of the Imperial General Staff , that he should be ready to send possibly two infantry divisions to France. One week later, Murray received a request for the first infantry division and dispatched the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division. He was assured that none of his mounted units would be transferred from the EEF, and was told "that there was no intention of curtailing such activities as he considered justified by his resources." Murray repeated his estimate that five infantry divisions, in addition to the mounted units, were needed for offensive operations.

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>As the Allied operations in the Middle East were secondary to the Western Front campaign, reinforcements requested by General Sir Archibald Murray, commander of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF), were denied. Further, on 11 January 1917, the War Cabinet informed Murray that large scale operations in Palestine were to be deferred until September, and he was informed by Field Marshal William Robertson, the Chief of the Imperial General Staff , that he should be ready to send possibly two infantry divisions to France. ⇒連合国軍による中東での作戦行動は、西部戦線の野戦に対して二次的な立場に置かれていたので、エジプト遠征軍(EEF)の指揮官アーチバルド・マレイ卿将軍によって要請された軍の強化は拒絶された。さらに、1917年1月11日に、戦争内閣はパレスチナでの大規模作戦行動が9月まで延期されることになったことをマレイに知らせた。さらに彼マレイは、おそらく歩兵2個師団をフランスに派遣する準備をしなければならないことを参謀本部総長ウィリアム・ロバートソン陸軍元帥から知らされた。 >One week later, Murray received a request for the first infantry division and dispatched the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division. He was assured that none of his mounted units would be transferred from the EEF, and was told "that there was no intention of curtailing such activities as he considered justified by his resources." Murray repeated his estimate that five infantry divisions, in addition to the mounted units, were needed for offensive operations. ⇒1週間後に、マレイは最初の歩兵師団の要請を受けて、第42(東ランカシア)師団を送り出した。彼は、いかなる騎馬部隊もEEFから移されることはないと確信していたし、「貴殿(マレイ)が、持分の(人的・物的)資源によって妥当と考えるような作戦行動(まで)を節減する意図はありません」と聞かされた。マレイは、攻撃的な作戦行動のためには、騎馬部隊に加えて、5個の歩兵師団が必要であるとの見積を繰り返した。

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