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In January 1917, the Second Army (II Anzac, IX, X and VIII corps) held the line in Flanders from Laventie to Boesinghe with eleven divisions and up to two in reserve. There was much trench mortaring, mining and raiding by both sides and from January to May, the Second Army had 20,000 casualties. In May, reinforcements began moving to Flanders from the south; the II Corps headquarters and 17 divisions had arrived by the end of the month. In January 1916, General Herbert Plumer, the Second Army commander, began to plan offensives against Messines Ridge, Lille and Houthulst Forest. General Henry Rawlinson was also ordered to plan an attack from the Ypres Salient on 4 February; planning continued but the Battle of Verdun and the Battle of the Somme took up the rest of the year. At meetings in November 1916, Haig, the French commander-in-chief Joseph Joffre and the other Allies met at Chantilly. The commanders agreed on a strategy of simultaneous attacks to overwhelm the Central Powers on the Western, Eastern and Italian fronts, by the first fortnight of February 1917. A meeting in London of the Admiralty and the General Staff urged that the Flanders operation be undertaken in 1917 and Joffre replied on 8 December, agreeing to a Flanders campaign after the spring offensive. The plan for a year of attrition offensives on the Western Front, with the main effort to be made in the summer by the BEF, was scrapped by the new French Commander-in-Chief Robert Nivelle. Nivelle planned an operation in three parts, with preliminary offensives to pin German reserves by the British at Arras and the French between the Somme and the Oise, then a French breakthrough offensive on the Aisne, followed by pursuit and exploitation. The plan was welcomed by Haig with reservations, which he addressed on 6 January.

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>In January 1917, the Second Army (II Anzac, IX, X and VIII corps) held the line in Flanders from Laventie to Boesinghe with eleven divisions and up to two in reserve. There was much trench mortaring, mining and raiding by both sides and from January to May, the Second Army had 20,000 casualties. In May, reinforcements began moving to Flanders from the south; the II Corps headquarters and 17 divisions had arrived by the end of the month. ⇒1917年1月、第2方面軍(第IIアンザック軍団、第IX、第X、第VIII各英軍団)は、11個師団と最高2個予備師団でラヴェンティーからボエジンゲまでのフランドル戦線を掌握した。1月から5月にかけて、塹壕の両側から迫撃砲攻撃、地雷攻撃、急襲侵入をかけて、第2方面軍は20,000人の犠牲者を被った。5月に、増援隊は南からフランドルへ移動し始め、第II軍団本部と17個師団が、月末までに到着した。 >In January 1916, General Herbert Plumer, the Second Army commander, began to plan offensives against Messines Ridge, Lille and Houthulst Forest. General Henry Rawlinson was also ordered to plan an attack from the Ypres Salient on 4 February; planning continued but the Battle of Verdun and the Battle of the Somme took up the rest of the year. At meetings in November 1916, Haig, the French commander-in-chief Joseph Joffre and the other Allies met at Chantilly. ⇒1916年1月に、第2方面軍指揮官ハーバート・プルーマー将軍は、メッシネス・リッジ(尾根)、リール、ホウツルスト・フォレスト(森)に対する攻撃を計画し始めた。ヘンリー・ローリンソン将軍も、2月4日にイープル突出部から攻撃を予定するよう命令された。計画は続いたが、「ヴェルダンの戦い」と「ソンムの戦い」はその年の残りいっぱいかかった。1916年11月の会議で、ヘイグ、フランス軍司令官ジョセフ・ジョフル、および他の連合国軍がシャンティイで会談した。 >The commanders agreed on a strategy of simultaneous attacks to overwhelm the Central Powers on the Western, Eastern and Italian fronts, by the first fortnight of February 1917. A meeting in London of the Admiralty and the General Staff urged that the Flanders operation be undertaken in 1917 and Joffre replied on 8 December, agreeing to a Flanders campaign after the spring offensive. ⇒指揮官らは、1917年2月の最初の2週間までに西部戦線、東部戦線、およびイタリア前線で中央同盟国を圧倒するための同時攻撃の戦略について合意に達した。ロンドンでの海軍本部と参謀幕僚の会議は、フランドル作戦行動を1917年に行うべきであると主張した。そして、ジョフルが12月8日に答えて、春攻勢の後のフランドル野戦に同意した。 >The plan for a year of attrition offensives on the Western Front, with the main effort to be made in the summer by the BEF, was scrapped by the new French Commander-in-Chief Robert Nivelle. Nivelle planned an operation in three parts, with preliminary offensives to pin German reserves by the British at Arras and the French between the Somme and the Oise, then a French breakthrough offensive on the Aisne, followed by pursuit and exploitation. The plan was welcomed by Haig with reservations, which he addressed on 6 January. ⇒BEFによって夏に行われる主要な奮闘である西部戦線の(欠員を補充しない)消耗攻撃の1年計画は、新しいフランス軍司令官ロベール・ニヴェーユによって廃棄された。ニヴェーユは、3つの部分に分けた作戦行動を計画した。予備攻撃でアラスの英国軍とソンム・オアーズ間のフランス軍とがドイツ予備軍を釘付けにする。それから、フランス軍の突破攻撃をエーンにかけ、追跡と接収・開発を続ける。ヘイグは、この計画を一旦受理して保留としていたが、1月6日に受託を申し出た。

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