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The attacks would confront the German 6th Army with a joint offensive, on a 70 mi (110 km) front, eastwards into the Douai plain, where an advance of 10–15 mi (16–24 km) would cut the railways supplying the German armies as far south as Reims. The French attacked Vimy Ridge and the British attacked further north in the Battle of Aubers Ridge (9 May) and the Battle of Festubert (15–25 May). The battle was fought during the German offensive of the Second Battle of Ypres (21 April – 25 May), which the Germans ended to reinforce the Artois front. The initial French attack broke through and captured Vimy Ridge but reserve units were not able to reinforce the troops on the ridge, before German counter-attacks forced them back about half-way to their jumping-off points. The British attack at Aubers Ridge was a costly failure and two German divisions in reserve were diverted south against the Tenth Army. The British offensive was suspended until 15 May, when the Battle of Festubert began and French attacks from 15 May to 15 June were concentrated on the flanks to create jumping-off points for a second general offensive, which began on 16 June. The British attacks at Festubert forced the Germans back 1.9 mi (3 km) and diverted reserves from the French but the Tenth Army gained little more ground, despite firing double the amount of artillery ammunition, at the cost of many casualties to both sides. On 18 June, the main offensive was stopped and local attacks were ended on 25 June. The French offensive had advanced the front line about 1.9 mi (3 km) towards Vimy Ridge, on an 5.0 mi (8 km) front. The failure to break through, despite the expenditure of 2,155,862 shells and the suffering of 102,500 casualties, led to recriminations against Joffre; the German 6th Army suffered 73,072 casualties. A lull followed until the Second Battle of Champagne, the Third Battle of Artois and the Battle of Loos in September. After the Marne campaign in 1914, French offensives in Artois, Champagne and at St Mihiel had been costly failures, leading to criticism of the leadership of General Joseph Joffre, within the army and the French government. The French President, Raymond Poincaré, arranged several meetings between Joffre and the Council of Ministers (Conseil des ministres) in March and April 1915, where reports of the failed operations were debated, particularly a condemnation of the April offensive against the St Mihiel salient. Joffre retained undivided command and freedom to conduct operations as he saw fit, which had been given at the beginning of the war but was instructed to consult with his subordinates; provisional army groups, which had been established in late 1914, were made permanent soon afterwards.

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>The attacks would confront the German 6th Army with a joint offensive, on a 70 mi (110 km) front, eastwards into the Douai plain, where an advance of 10–15 mi (16–24 km) would cut the railways supplying the German armies as far south as Reims. The French attacked Vimy Ridge and the British attacked further north in the Battle of Aubers Ridge (9 May) and the Battle of Festubert (15–25 May). ⇒攻撃については、合同攻撃でドイツ第6方面軍と対決してドゥーエ平野の東70マイル(110キロ)の前線で10-15マイル(16-24キロ)前進するとドイツ方面軍に供給される鉄道が南のランスまで切断されるだろう。「オーベル・リッジの戦い」(5月9日)と「フェストゥベールの戦い」(5月15-25日)でフランス軍はヴィミー・リッジを攻撃し、英国軍はさらに北を攻撃した。 >The battle was fought during the German offensive of the Second Battle of Ypres (21 April – 25 May), which the Germans ended to reinforce the Artois front. The initial French attack broke through and captured Vimy Ridge but reserve units were not able to reinforce the troops on the ridge, before German counter-attacks forced them back about half-way to their jumping-off points. The British attack at Aubers Ridge was a costly failure and two German divisions in reserve were diverted south against the Tenth Army. ⇒この戦いは、「第二次イーペルの戦い」(4月21日-5月25日)のドイツ攻勢の間に戦われたが、それによってドイツ軍はアルトワ前線の強化を終了した。当初のフランス軍攻撃ではヴィミー・リッジを突破し攻略したが、予備部隊が尾根の軍隊を強化できないうちに、ドイツ軍の反撃によってほぼ出撃始発点との中間地点まで押し戻された。オーベル・リッジでの英国軍の攻撃は高くついて失敗し、ドイツ予備軍の第2師団が第10方面軍に対抗して南へ転向した。 >The British offensive was suspended until 15 May, when the Battle of Festubert began and French attacks from 15 May to 15 June were concentrated on the flanks to create jumping-off points for a second general offensive, which began on 16 June.  The British attacks at Festubert forced the Germans back 1.9 mi (3 km) and diverted reserves from the French but the Tenth Army gained little more ground, despite firing double the amount of artillery ammunition, at the cost of many casualties to both sides. On 18 June, the main offensive was stopped and local attacks were ended on 25 June. ⇒英国軍の攻撃は5月15日まで中断されたが、その時点で「フェストゥベールの戦い」が始まり、5月15日から6月15日までのフランス軍の攻撃は側面に集中し、6月16日に始まる第2回総攻撃の出撃始発点を創設した。  フェストゥベールにおける英国軍の攻撃はドイツ軍を1.9マイル(3キロ)後退させ、フランス軍から予備軍を転向させたが、第10方面軍は2倍の砲弾を発射したにも関わらず、両軍に多くの犠牲者を出し、地面もほとんど獲得しなかった。6月18日、主要攻撃が停止され、6月25日に局地攻撃を終了した。 >The French offensive had advanced the front line about 1.9 mi (3 km) towards Vimy Ridge, on an 5.0 mi (8 km) front. The failure to break through, despite the expenditure of 2,155,862 shells and the suffering of 102,500 casualties, led to recriminations against Joffre; the German 6th Army suffered 73,072 casualties. A lull followed until the Second Battle of Champagne, the Third Battle of Artois and the Battle of Loos in September. After the Marne campaign in 1914, French offensives in Artois, Champagne and at St Mihiel had been costly failures, leading to criticism of the leadership of General Joseph Joffre, within the army and the French government. ⇒フランス軍の攻勢は、ヴィミー・リッジに向かって5マイル(8キロ)幅の前線を約1.9マイル(3キロ)前進した。2,155,862発の砲弾の消費と102,500人の死傷者の被害にも関わらず、突破に失敗したため、ジョフルに対する非難に至った。ドイツ第6方面軍は73,072人の死傷者を被った。9月の「第二次シャンパーニュの戦い」、「第三次アルトワの戦い」、および「ロースの戦い」(が始まる)まで、小康状態が続いた。1914年のマルヌ野戦の後、アルトワ、シャンパーニュ、およびサンミヒエルでのフランス軍の攻撃は高くついた失敗であり、軍隊とフランス政府内でのジョセフ・ジョフル将軍の指導力に対する批判につながった。 ⇒The French President, Raymond Poincaré, arranged several meetings between Joffre and the Council of Ministers (Conseil des ministres) in March and April 1915, where reports of the failed operations were debated, particularly a condemnation of the April offensive against the St Mihiel salient. Joffre retained undivided command and freedom to conduct operations as he saw fit, which had been given at the beginning of the war but was instructed to consult with his subordinates; provisional army groups, which had been established in late 1914, were made permanent soon afterwards. >フランスのレイモンド・ポアンカレ大統領は、1915年3月と4月にジョフルと閣僚会議の間で数次にわたる会議を開催し、そこで失敗した作戦行動の報告が議論された。特に、4月のセント・ミヒエルの攻撃に対する非難が討議された。ジョフルは、自分で適切だと思うように、分割されていない指揮権と作戦行動の自由を戦争初期に与えられて保持したが、ただし部下と相談をするように指示されていた。1914年後半に設立された暫定的な方面軍グループは、その後間もなく恒久的になった。

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