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The German Admiralty also decided that the Type UB II submarine would be ideal for Mediterranean service. Since these were too large to be shipped in sections by rail to Pola like the Type UB I, the materials for their construction and German workers to assemble them were sent instead. This meant a shortage of workers to complete U-boats for service in home waters, but it seemed justified by the successes in the Mediterranean in November, when 44 ships were sunk, for a total of 155,882 tons. The total in December fell to 17 ships (73,741 tons) which was still over half the total tonnage sunk in all theaters of operation at the time.

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以下のとおりお答えします。 地中海でのUボートの活躍ぶりを述べています。 >The German Admiralty also decided that the Type UB II submarine would be ideal for Mediterranean service. Since these were too large to be shipped in sections by rail to Pola like the Type UB I, the materials for their construction and German workers to assemble them were sent instead. ⇒ドイツ海軍省はまた、UB II型潜水艦が、地中海での戦役に理想的であると決定した。これは大きすぎて、UB I型のように部品に分解して鉄道でポーラに輸送できなかったので、代りに、その造船組み立てのために建造素材およびドイツ人労働者が送られた。 >This meant a shortage of workers to complete U-boats for service in home waters, but it seemed justified by the successes in the Mediterranean in November, when 44 ships were sunk, for a total of 155,882 tons. The total in December fell to 17 ships (73,741 tons) which was still over half the total tonnage sunk in all theaters of operation at the time. ⇒これは、本国の水域で戦役用のUボートを完成するための労働者の不足を意味していたが、11月に地中海で44隻の船舶、合計155,882トン分が沈められた時の成功によって、それでよかったのだと見られた。12月の合計は、船舶17隻(73,741トン)に低下したが、それでも、当時(Uボートによる攻撃)作戦の行われた、全戦場における撃沈船舶の合計トン数の半分強であった。

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