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With 1.5 million Russian forces facing just 1 million combined German and Austro-Hungarians the Russian prospects appeared good. Alexeev consequently chose to launch the offensive in the north where the numerical disparity was at its greatest. He therefore instructed General Kuropatkin's Northern Army Group to attack from the northeast towards Vilnius; the focus of the attack however was to be from the east of the city, led by General Smirnov's Second Army (part of Evert's Western Army Group) consisting of 350,000 men and 1,000 guns, against which were ranged just 75,000 men and 400 guns of Eichhorn's German Tenth Army.

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  • Nakay702
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以下のとおりお答えします。ドイツ軍の「手すき」と見込まれるところに攻撃を仕かけようというロシア軍の作戦を述べています。 >With 1.5 million Russian forces facing just 1 million combined German and Austro-Hungarians the Russian prospects appeared good. Alexeev consequently chose to launch the offensive in the north where the numerical disparity was at its greatest. ⇒150万人のロシア軍に、ちょうど100万人のドイツ軍とオーストリア-ハンガリー軍の結合軍とが対峙するので、ロシア軍の見込みはよさそうであった。その結果アレックスィーフは、数の相違が最大であった北部への攻撃を選んだ。 >He therefore instructed General Kuropatkin's Northern Army Group to attack from the northeast towards Vilnius; the focus of the attack however was to be from the east of the city, led by General Smirnov's Second Army (part of Evert's Western Army Group) consisting of 350,000 men and 1,000 guns, against which were ranged just 75,000 men and 400 guns of Eichhorn's German Tenth Army. ⇒したがって彼は、クロパトキン将軍の北部方面軍集団に対して北東からヴィルニュスに向って攻撃をしかけるように指示した。しかし攻撃は、都市の東に焦点が当てられた。指揮官はスミルノフ将軍で、その軍隊は350,000人の兵士と1,000丁の銃からなる彼の第2方面軍(およびエバートの西部方面隊グループの一部)であった。それに対峙したのが、アイヒホルンのドイツ軍第10方面軍、兵士75,000人と銃400丁であった。

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