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In cooperation with the German 9th Army, the Romanian invasion was repelled and its forces were thrown back across the border within eight weeks, leading to Arz receiving the respect and appreciation of the new Austro-Hungarian emperor, Karl I. Other commanders also hailed his achievements during the campaign, with Conrad writing that he had "proved to be an energetic resolute leader in the most difficult situations..." and Boroević stating that Arz was an "Honourable, noble character....outstanding general." Arz was to remain in charge of the 1st Army until February 1917, after major operations in Romania ended, with help from Falkenhayn's 9th German Army and from the German Army of the Danube under Mackensen.Karl I of Austria succeeded Franz Joseph as Emperor on 21 November 1916, bringing with him a wave of change across the upper echelons of the government and military command.

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>In cooperation with the German 9th Army, the Romanian invasion was repelled and its forces were thrown back across the border within eight weeks, leading to Arz receiving the respect and appreciation of the new Austro-Hungarian emperor, Karl I. Other commanders also hailed his achievements during the campaign, with Conrad writing that he had "proved to be an energetic resolute leader in the most difficult situations..." and Boroević stating that Arz was an "Honourable, noble character....outstanding general." ⇒(アルツは)ドイツ第9方面軍と協力してルーマニア軍の侵入を撃退し、8週間以内でその軍団を境界線の向こう側にはじき返したので、アルツはオーストリア‐ハンガリーの新皇帝カールI世の尊敬と評価を受けるに至った。他の指揮官も、野戦の間に彼の業績を絶賛し、コンラッド文書にはこう認められた。彼は、「最大の窮状に精力的かつ断固として当たった指導者であることが証明されました…」、そして、ボロエヴィックはこう述べている。アルツは、「尊敬すべき、高貴な人物にして…秀でた将軍」であった、と。 >Arz was to remain in charge of the 1st Army until February 1917, after major operations in Romania ended, with help from Falkenhayn's 9th German Army and from the German Army of the Danube under Mackensen. ⇒アルツは、ファルケンハインのドイツ第9方面軍およびマッケンゼン麾下のドイツ・ダニューブ方面軍から援助を得てルーマニアでの主要な作戦行動を終えた後、1917年2月まで第1方面軍の担当に残ることになった。 >Karl I of Austria succeeded Franz Joseph as Emperor on 21 November 1916, bringing with him a wave of change across the upper echelons of the government and military command. ⇒オーストリアのカールI世は、1916年11月21日に、皇帝としてフランツ・ジョセフの跡を継ぎ、政府と軍司令部の上層部全体にわたる変化の波をもたらした。

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