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In 2007, Jean Glad wrote that the length of the siege deprived the German 1st and 2nd armies of troops, adding to their difficulties as they pursued the retreating Franco-British Armies towards the Marne. The siege was primarily an artillery operation, in which the infantry of the VII Reserve Corps followed up French retirements caused by the destructive effects of the German super-heavy artillery. Fournier might have delayed the opening of the German bombardment by occupying advanced positions beyond the eastern perimeter but lack of troops and their inexperience led Fournier to fear that they might collapse when the Germans attacked and leave the way clear to the town. In Principal Events, 1914–1918 (1922) British official historians recorded that 40,000 French soldiers were taken prisoner during the siege of Maubeuge. Hew Strachan in 2003 wrote that 600 guns were captured by the Germans and in a 2004 web article, Didier Lodier wrote that 1,300 French troops had been killed and 45,000 men (including 3,000 wounded) were captured along with 400 guns (most damaged) for 2,500 German casualties. In 2009, Holger Herwig wrote that the Germans took 32,692 prisoners and 450 guns when Maubeuge was surrendered on 6 September; the Germans suffered 1,100 casualties. The Battle of the Trouée de Charmes (French: Bataille de la trouée de Charmes) or Battle of the Mortagne was fought at the beginning of World War I, between 24 and 26 August 1914 by the French Second Army and the German 6th Army, after the big German victory at the Battle of the Frontiers, earlier in August. From 1874 to 1880, General Raymond Adolphe Séré de Rivières oversaw the construction of the Séré de Rivières system, a line of fortresses 65 km (40 mi) long from Belfort to Épinal and another line 65 km (40 mi) long from Toul to Verdun, about 40 km (25 mi) from the Franco–German border. The River Meuse flows northwards from Toul to Verdun, Mézières and Givet on the Belgian border and there is a tributary of the Moselle between Belfort and Épinal, the rivers running near parallel to the 1871–1919 Franco–German border. A 70 km (43 mi) wide interruption in the French fortifications was left between Épinal and Toul, known as the Trouée de Charmes (Charmes Gap), which was west of Nancy, about 12 km (7.5 mi) from the Franco-German frontier. The Battle of the Trouée de Charmes トゥルームドシャルムの戦い ※読みがわかりません。

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>In 2007, Jean Glad wrote that the length of the siege deprived the German 1st and 2nd armies of troops, adding to their difficulties as they pursued the retreating Franco-British Armies towards the Marne. The siege was primarily an artillery operation, in which the infantry of the VII Reserve Corps followed up French retirements caused by the destructive effects of the German super-heavy artillery. Fournier might have delayed the opening of the German bombardment by occupying advanced positions beyond the eastern perimeter but lack of troops and their inexperience led Fournier to fear that they might collapse when the Germans attacked and leave the way clear to the town. ⇒2007年、ジャン・グラッドは、長びいた包囲戦がドイツ第1、第2方面軍から軍隊を奪い、マルヌに向けて撤退する仏英軍に対する追撃を困難にした、と書いた。包囲戦は主に砲撃作戦であり、第VII予備軍団の歩兵隊はドイツ軍の超重砲撃の破壊的な影響によって引き起こされたフランス軍の退却を追跡した。フルニエは東部境界を越えて前進した陣地を占拠することでドイツ軍の砲撃の開始を遅らせたかもしれないが、軍隊や経験の不足により、(フルニエは)ドイツ軍が攻撃して町に道を開けると、それ(陣地)が崩壊するのではないかと恐れた。 >In Principal Events, 1914–1918 (1922) British official historians recorded that 40,000 French soldiers were taken prisoner during the siege of Maubeuge. Hew Strachan in 2003 wrote that 600 guns were captured by the Germans and in a 2004 web article, Didier Lodier wrote that 1,300 French troops had been killed and 45,000 men (including 3,000 wounded) were captured along with 400 guns (most damaged) for 2,500 German casualties. In 2009, Holger Herwig wrote that the Germans took 32,692 prisoners and 450 guns when Maubeuge was surrendered on 6 September; the Germans suffered 1,100 casualties. ⇒英国の公報史家らは、「主要事変、1914-1918年」(1922年刊)の中で、モーブージュ包囲中に40,000人のフランス兵が捕虜になった、と記録している。ヒュー・ストラチャンは、2003年に600丁の銃がドイツ軍に捕獲されたと書き、ディディエ・ロディエは2004年のウェブ記事で、2,500人のドイツ軍の死傷者および400丁の銃(の最悪損傷)と引き換えに1,300人のフランス軍が殺され、45,000人のフランス軍が捕縛された(3,000人の負傷者を含む)、と書いている。2009年、ホルガー・ヘルヴィヒは、9月6日にモーブージュが降伏したとき、ドイツ軍が32,692人の囚人と450丁の銃を奪ったが、ドイツ軍は1,100人の死傷者を出した(だけだった)、と書いた。 >The Battle of the Trouée de Charmes (French: Bataille de la trouée de Charmes) or Battle of the Mortagne was fought at the beginning of World War I, between 24 and 26 August 1914 by the French Second Army and the German 6th Army, after the big German victory at the Battle of the Frontiers, earlier in August. From 1874 to 1880, General Raymond Adolphe Séré de Rivières oversaw the construction of the Séré de Rivières system, a line of fortresses 65 km (40 mi) long from Belfort to Épinal and another line 65 km (40 mi) long from Toul to Verdun, about 40 km (25 mi) from the Franco–German border. ⇒「トゥルエ・ド・シャルムの戦い」(フランス語:Bataille de latrouéede Charmes)または「モルターニュの戦い」は、第一次世界大戦の初め、1914年8月上旬に「国境線の戦い」でドイツ軍が大勝利を収めた後、8月24-26日にフランス第2方面軍とドイツ第6方面軍によって行われた会戦である。1874年から1880年にかけて、レイモン・アドルフ・セレ・ド・リヴィエール将軍は、ベルフォールからエピナルまでの65キロ(40マイル)と、トゥールからヴェルダンまで65キロ(40マイル)の要塞戦線であるセレ・ド・リヴィエールシステムの建設を監督した。フランス-ドイツの国境から約40キロ(25マイル)の地点であった。 >The River Meuse flows northwards from Toul to Verdun, Mézières and Givet on the Belgian border and there is a tributary of the Moselle between Belfort and Épinal, the rivers running near parallel to the 1871–1919 Franco–German border. A 70 km (43 mi) wide interruption in the French fortifications was left between Épinal and Toul, known as the Trouée de Charmes (Charmes Gap), which was west of Nancy, about 12 km (7.5 mi) from the Franco-German frontier. ⇒ミューズ川は、ベルギー国境のトゥールから北に向かってヴェルダン、メジエール、ジヴェへと流れ、ベルフォールとエピナルの間にモーゼル川の支流がある。これらの川は1871-1919年当時のフランス-ドイツ国境にほぼ平行に流れていた。フランス軍の要塞群中、エピナールとトゥールの間には、トゥルエ・ド・シャルム(シャルムの間隙)として知られる70キロ(43マイル)の空白部があった。それは、フランス-ドイツ国境から約12キロ(7.5マイル)のナンシーの西にあった。

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