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Joseph Joffre, who had been Commander-in-Chief of the French army since 1911 and the Minister of War, Adolphe Messimy met on 1 August, to agree that the military conduct of the war should exclusively be the responsibility of the Commander-in-Chief. On 2 August, as small parties of German soldiers crossed the French border Messimy told Joffre that he had the freedom to order French troops across the German but not the Belgian frontier. Joffre sent warning orders to the covering forces near the frontier, requiring the VII Corps to prepare to advance towards Mühlhausen (French: Mulhouse) to the north-east of Belfort and XX Corps to make ready to begin an offensive towards Nancy. As soon as news arrived that German troops had entered Luxembourg the Fourth Army was ordered to move between the Third and Fifth armies, ready to attack to the north of Verdun. Operations into Belgium were forbidden to deny the Germans a pretext until 4 August when it was certain that German troops had already violated the Belgian border. To comply with the Franco-Russian Alliance Joffre ordered an invasion of Alsace-Lorraine on for 14 August, although anticipating a German offensive through Belgium.

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以下のとおりお答えします。 前回に続き、第一次世界大戦の、ヨーロッパ会戦勃発の前後のことが述べられています。 >Joseph Joffre, who had been Commander-in-Chief of the French army since 1911 and the Minister of War, Adolphe Messimy met on 1 August, to agree that the military conduct of the war should exclusively be the responsibility of the Commander-in-Chief. On 2 August, as small parties of German soldiers crossed the French border Messimy told Joffre that he had the freedom to order French troops across the German but not the Belgian frontier. ⇒1911年以来フランス方面軍総司令官であるジョセフ・ジョフルが、8月1日に戦争大臣のアドルフ・メシミーと会談し、本戦の軍隊指揮をもっぱら総司令官の責務とすることに同意した。8月2日、ドイツ兵の小部隊がフランス国境を越えたので、フランス軍隊も、ベルギーを除いてドイツを横切ることを命じる自由がある、とメシミーはジョフルに語った。 >Joffre sent warning orders to the covering forces near the frontier, requiring the VII Corps to prepare to advance towards Mühlhausen (French: Mulhouse) to the north-east of Belfort and XX Corps to make ready to begin an offensive towards Nancy. As soon as news arrived that German troops had entered Luxembourg the Fourth Army was ordered to move between the Third and Fifth armies, ready to attack to the north of Verdun. ⇒ジョフルは、国境付近に展開している部隊に警戒命令を送り、第7軍団に対してミュールハウゼン(フランス語でMulhouse〔ミュルーズ〕)に向ってベルフォート東北部への進軍を準備するように命じ、第20軍団にはナンシーに向って攻撃を準備するよう命じた。ルクセンブルグにドイツ軍部隊が侵入したとのニュースが届くや否や、第4方面軍は、第3方面軍と第5方面軍の間を移動して、ヴェルダン北部を攻撃する準備をするよう命じられた。 >Operations into Belgium were forbidden to deny the Germans a pretext until 4 August when it was certain that German troops had already violated the Belgian border. To comply with the Franco-Russian Alliance Joffre ordered an invasion of Alsace-Lorraine on for 14 August, although anticipating a German offensive through Belgium. ⇒すでにドイツ軍がベルギー国境を侵略していることが確実になった8月4日までに、ドイツ軍の口実(戦争にかこつけた国境侵犯)を拒絶するために、ベルギー領内への作戦行動が禁止された。ジョフルは、「仏露同盟」に従ってアルザス‐ロレーヌへの侵攻を命じたが、(依然)ベルギーを経由してくるドイツ軍の攻撃が予想された。

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1911年よりフランス陸軍参謀総長(脚注参照)であったジョゼフ・ジョフルは、戦争省大臣のアドルフ・メシミーと会談し戦時の軍隊指揮を参謀総長の専任責務とすることに同意した。 (脚注 通常、軍の制服組の最高指揮官は参謀総長なのでそのように訳しました。現場の軍や軍団に派遣された場合には総司令官と訳します。) 8月2日、ドイツ兵の小部隊がフランス国境に越えたとき、メシミーは、フランス軍部隊がベルギーを除きドイツへ越境する命令を下す自由を得たとジョフルに話した。 ジョフルは国境付近に配備された部隊へ警戒命令を送り、第7軍団に対しミュールハウゼン(フランス名Mulhouse)方面からベルフォート東北部に前進する準備を、第20軍団にはナンシー方面の攻撃を準備するよう命令した。 ルクセンブルグにドイツ軍部隊が侵入したとのニュースが到着すると直ちに、第4軍は第3軍と第5軍の中間を移動して、ベルダン北部を攻撃する準備をするよう命令を受けた。 ベルギー領内の作戦は禁止されているはずだというドイツ側の口実を否定するため、ドイツ軍が既にベルギー国境を侵略しているという確信を8月4日までに得た。 ベルギー経由でドイツ軍の(フランスへの)攻撃が予想されたが、露仏同盟(Franco-Russian Alliance )に従い、8月14日、ジョフルはアルザス・ロレーヌの侵攻を命令した。

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