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Falkenhayn wrote in his memoir that he sent an appreciation of the strategic situation to the Kaiser in December 1915, The string in France has reached breaking point. A mass breakthrough—which in any case is beyond our means—is unnecessary. Within our reach there are objectives for the retention of which the French General Staff would be compelled to throw in every man they have. If they do so the forces of France will bleed to death. — Falkenhayn The German strategy in 1916 was to inflict mass casualties on the French, a goal achieved against the Russians from 1914 to 1915, to weaken the French Army to the point of collapse. The French Army had to be drawn into circumstances from which it could not escape, for reasons of strategy and prestige.

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>Falkenhayn wrote in his memoir that he sent an appreciation of the strategic situation to the Kaiser in December 1915,. The string in France has reached breaking point. A mass breakthrough—which in any case is beyond our means—is unnecessary. Within our reach there are objectives for the retention of which the French General Staff would be compelled to throw in every man they have. If they do so the forces of France will bleed to death. — Falkenhayn >ファルケンハインは、1915年12月に、戦略状況の認識評価をカイゼル(ドイツ皇帝)に送った回顧録に書き込んいた。 フランスでの方面縦隊は、極限点に達しました。大規模突破―いずれにせよそれは我々の軍資力を越えていますが―それは、不必要です。我々の手の届く範囲の中に目標があって、それをフランス軍が保持するためにはフランス参謀幕僚は保有する全兵士を注ぎ込まざるを得なくなるでしょう。もしそんなことを彼らがするならば、フランス軍の軍団は出血多量で死に至ることでしょう。 — ファルケンハイン >The German strategy in 1916 was to inflict mass casualties on the French, a goal achieved against the Russians from 1914 to 1915, to weaken the French Army to the point of collapse. The French Army had to be drawn into circumstances from which it could not escape, for reasons of strategy and prestige. ⇒1916年のドイツの戦略は、多数の犠牲者をフランス軍に課すことだったが、1つの目標が1914年から1915年にかけてロシア軍に対して達成された。そして、崩壊といっていいほどフランス軍を弱体化した。フランス軍は、戦略と威信上の理由で、逃亡することのできない状況に引きずる込まれざるを得なくなった。

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