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日本語訳を! 5-(7)

お願いします。 (18) Abydos wasn't the only sacred site. There were many others throughout Egypt. Some temples were mortuary temples for dead kings, and others were built to honor a particular god. Some, like Abydos, were both. Abydos honored Osiris, and because Osiris was the King of the Dead, it also became an important burial ground. (19) For Egyptians, the stories about the gods were comforting and provided guidance in a world that was unpredictable and governed by forces they didn't understand. Horus watched over them in this life. Osiris watched over them in death. When their world was in turmoil, they believed it was Seth fighting with Horus that created the chaos. When all was well, they were sure that Horus had won the battle. They believed that one day Horus would defeat Seth in a smashing final combat. Then Osiris would be able to return to the world of the living and all sorrow would end. Until then, it was a god-eat-god world.

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(18) アビドスは、唯一の聖地ではありませんでした。 多くの他の聖地が、エジプト中の至る所にありました。 寺院の中には、死んだ王を弔うための寺院もありましたし、特定の神を祭るために建てられた寺院もありました。 また、アビドスのように、その両方を兼ねる寺院もありました。 アビドスは、オシリスを祭りました。そして、オシリスが、死者の王であったので、アビドスは、また、重要な埋葬地にもなりました。 (19) エジプト人にとって、神についての物語は、慰めとなるものであり、予測のできない、彼らの理解の及ばない力によって支配される世界において助言を提供しました。 ホルスは、現世で、彼らを見守りました。 オシリスは、死後の世界で、彼らを見守りました。 世の中が、乱れている時、彼らは、混沌を創り出したのは、ホルスと戦っているセトだと信じました。すべてが、順調な時は、彼らは、ホルスが戦いに勝ったのだと信じました。 ある日、ホルスが、圧倒的な闘いでセトを破ると、彼らは思っていました。 その時には、オシリスは、生者の世界に戻ることができ、すべての悲しみは終わるでしょう。 その時までは、それは、神と神の食うか食われるかの世界でした。

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18) Abydosは、唯一の聖地でありませんでした。 多くの他が、エジプト中至る所にありました。 若干の寺院は死んだ王のための霊安室寺院でした、そして、他の人は特定の神を礼拝するためにできていました。 いくつかは、Abydosのように、両方ともでした。 Abydosはオシリスを礼拝しました、そして、オシリスがDeadの国王であったので、それも重要な埋葬地になりました。 (19) エジプト人にとって、神についての話は、元気づけて、予測できなかった世界でガイダンスを提供して、彼らが理解しなかった軍隊によって支配しました。 ホルスは、この人生で彼らの世話をしました。 オシリスは、死で彼らの世話をしました。 世界が混乱にあったとき、彼らは混沌をつくったホルスを敵に戦うことがセスであると思っていました。 すべてがよかったとき、彼らはホルスが戦いに勝ったと確信しました。 ある日、ホルスが壊れている最終的な戦闘でセスを破ると、彼らは思っていました。 それから、オシリスは生計の世界に戻ることができます、そして、すべての悲しみは終わります。 その時までは、それは神-食べ物-神界でした

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