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日本語訳を! 5-(6)

お願いします。 (16) The statues were kept inside the temples, in the innermost room. The priests didn't believe the statue actually was the god, but they did believe the god's spirit lived inside the statue. In the morning, the high priests would break the clay seal on the sanctuary door. They would chant and burn incense. A priest would gently wake the god by lighting a torch, symbolic of the sunrise. The priests bathed, dressed, and presented food to the statue. Then when the day's rituals were completed, the priests would back out of the room, smoothing away their footprints with a reed broom. The sanctuary doors were sealed so that the god could get a good night's sleep undisturbed. (17) Plucking out your eyebrows and eyelashes may sound painful, but being a priest had advantages. For one thing, you didn't have to pay taxes. All the priests except the highest order spent only three months of the year serving at the temples. The rest of the time they lived ordinary lives, working at their professions―scribes, artists, musicians. And even the highest priests had families outside the temples.

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(16) その像は、寺院の内部の一番奥の部屋に安置されました。 神官たちは、その像が、実際に、神であるとは思っていませんでしたが、彼らは、神の霊魂が、像の中に宿っていると思っていました。 朝、位の高い神官が、聖域の扉を封印している粘土を壊しました。 彼らは、合唱して、香を焚きました。一人の神官が、日の出を象徴する、たいまつに点灯することによって、神を穏やかに起こします。 神官は、沐浴し、服を着て、その像に食物を供えました。 それから、1日の儀式が終了すると、神官たちは、その部屋から戻りました。そして、葦のほうきで彼らの足跡を掃き清めました。 神が、邪魔されることなく良き眠りを取れる様に、聖域の扉は、封印をされました。 (17) 眉とまつげを抜くことは、痛いと思うかもしれませんが、神官でいることは、利点がありました。 一つには、税を払う必要がありませんでした。 最も高い序列の神官以外、すべての神官は、寺院で務めを果たすのは、一年のうちわずか3ヵ月でした。 彼らは、残りの時間は、普通の生活をして、彼らの職業 ― 書記、美術家、音楽家に、従事しました。 そして、最も高い神官でさえ、寺院の外には家族がいました。

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