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英語が得意な方 和訳を助けてください。

英語が得意な方 和訳を助けてください。うまく訳せなくて困っています。 A ‘Political Advisory Committee’, comprised by one representative from each of the participating states, acted as the political leadership of the Warsaw Treaty Organization while the military leadership belonged to the United High Command based in Moscow that was always led by a Soviet supreme commander.

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『政治諮問委員会』は、参加各国の代表各1名によって構成され、ワルシャワ条約機構の政治的な指導部としての役目を果たしました、他方、軍の指揮は、常にソビエトの最高指揮官によって指揮されるモスクワに拠点を置く連邦最高司令部に属しました。 ☆旧東独、ソビエト等の文献や資料をネットで検索して、固有名詞は決定して下さい。

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