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The ship had a double bottom with the space between divided into separate watertight cells. The ship's exceptional height was due to the six decks of passenger accommodation above the waterline, compared to the customary four decks in existing liners. High-tensile steel was used for the ship's plating, as opposed to the more conventional mild steel. This allowed a reduction in plate thickness, reducing weight but still providing 26 percent greater strength than otherwise. Plates were held together by triple rows of rivets. The ship was heated and cooled throughout by a thermo-tank ventilation system, which used steam driven heat exchangers to warm air to a constant 65 °F (18.3 °C), while steam was injected into the airflow to maintain steady humidity. Forty-nine separate units driven by electric fans provided seven complete changes of air per hour throughout the ship, through an interconnected system, so that individual units could be switched off for maintenance. A separate system of exhaust fans removed air from galleys and bathrooms. As built, the ship conformed fully with Board of Trade safety regulations which required sixteen lifeboats with a capacity of approximately 1,000 people. At the time of her completion Lusitania was briefly the largest ship ever built, but was eclipsed in this respect by the slightly larger Mauretania which entered service shortly thereafter. She was 70 feet (21 m) longer, a full 2 knots (3.7 km/h; 2.3 mph) faster, and had a capacity of 10,000 gross tons over and above that of the most modern German liner, Kronprinzessin Cecilie. Passenger accommodation was 50% larger than any of her competitors, providing for 552 saloon class, 460 cabin class and 1,186 in third class. Her crew comprised 69 on deck, 369 operating engines and boilers and 389 to attend to passengers. Both she and Mauretania had a wireless telegraph, electric lighting, electric lifts, sumptuous interiors and an early form of air-conditioning. At the time of their introduction onto the North Atlantic, both Lusitania and Mauretania possessed among the most luxurious, spacious and comfortable interiors afloat. The Scottish architect James Miller was chosen to design Lusitania's interiors, while Harold Peto was chosen to design Mauretania. Miller chose to use plasterwork to create interiors whereas Peto made extensive use of wooden panelling, with the result that the overall impression given by Lusitania was brighter than Mauretania. Lusitania's designs proved the more popular.

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>The ship had a double bottom with the space between divided into separate watertight cells. The ship's exceptional height was due to the six decks of passenger accommodation above the waterline, compared to the customary four decks in existing liners. ⇒船底は二重になっていて、その(2枚の)間のスペースは別々の水密セルに分割されていた。本船の並外れた高さは、既存の定期船の4段デッキと比較して、喫水線の上に6段デッキの乗客収容施設を持つためであった。 >High-tensile steel was used for the ship's plating, as opposed to the more conventional mild steel. This allowed a reduction in plate thickness, reducing weight but still providing 26 percent greater strength than otherwise. Plates were held together by triple rows of rivets. The ship was heated and cooled throughout by a thermo-tank ventilation system, which used steam driven heat exchangers to warm air to a constant 65 °F (18.3 °C), while steam was injected into the airflow to maintain steady humidity. ⇒船体の被覆めっきには、従来の軟鋼とは対照的に高張力鋼が使用された。これにより、プレートの厚みを薄くして重量を減らすことができたが、それでも他の方法より26%も高い強度が得られた。プレートは3列のリベットで固定されていた。船全体を加熱・冷却するのはサーモタンク(熱湯水槽)換気システムで、それは安定湿度を維持するために蒸気を空気流に注入する一方、蒸気駆動熱交換器を使用して空気を一定の65°F(18.3°C)に保つシステムである。 >Forty-nine separate units driven by electric fans provided seven complete changes of air per hour throughout the ship, through an interconnected system, so that individual units could be switched off for maintenance. A separate system of exhaust fans removed air from galleys and bathrooms. As built, the ship conformed fully with Board of Trade safety regulations which required sixteen lifeboats with a capacity of approximately 1,000 people. ⇒電動ファンで駆動される49個の独立した装置が、相互接続されたシステムを介して、船全体で1時間あたり7回の完全な空気交換を提供し、個々の装置をメンテナンスのためにオフにできる。別の排気ファンのシステムは、調理室と浴室から空気を除去する。本船は、建造時に、約1,000人の収容能力を備えた16隻の救命艇を要求する「貿易委員会」の安全規制に完全に準拠していた。 >At the time of her completion Lusitania was briefly the largest ship ever built, but was eclipsed in this respect by the slightly larger Mauretania which entered service shortly thereafter. She was 70 feet (21 m) longer, a full 2 knots (3.7 km/h; 2.3 mph) faster, and had a capacity of 10,000 gross tons over and above that of the most modern German liner, Kronprinzessin Cecilie. Passenger accommodation was 50% larger than any of her competitors, providing for 552 saloon class, 460 cabin class and 1,186 in third class. Her crew comprised 69 on deck, 369 operating engines and boilers and 389 to attend to passengers. Both she and Mauretania had a wireless telegraph, electric lighting, electric lifts, sumptuous interiors and an early form of air-conditioning. ⇒完成時のルシタニア号は、一時これまでに建造されたうちで最大の船であったが、そのすぐ後に就航したわずかに大きいモーレタニア号に株を奪われた。ルシタニア号は、ドイツの最新定期船であるクロンプリンツェッシン・セシリー号より70フィート(21 m)長く、優に2ノット(3.7キロ; 2.3マイル/毎時)速く、10,000トン以上の容量があった。乗客の宿泊施設は競合他社よりも50%大きく、サルーンクラス552人、キャビンクラス460人、サードクラス1,186人分を提供した。本船の乗組員は、デッキに69人、運転中のエンジン・ボイラー係369人、乗客の接待係389人で構成されていた。本船とモーレタニア号には、無線電信、電灯、電気リフト、豪華なインテリア、初期型のエアコンが備わっていた。 >At the time of their introduction onto the North Atlantic, both Lusitania and Mauretania possessed among the most luxurious, spacious and comfortable interiors afloat. The Scottish architect James Miller was chosen to design Lusitania's interiors, while Harold Peto was chosen to design Mauretania. Miller chose to use plasterwork to create interiors whereas Peto made extensive use of wooden panelling, with the result that the overall impression given by Lusitania was brighter than Mauretania. Lusitania's designs proved the more popular. ⇒北大西洋への導入(進水)の時点で、ルシタニア号とモーレタニア号の両船舶の船上・船内(状況)は、この上なくの豪華で広々とした快適なインテリアの所有を誇っていた。スコットランドの建築家ジェームス・ミラーがルシタニア号のインテリアを設計するために選ばれ、ハロルド・ペトがモーレタニア号を設計するために選ばれた。ミラーは石膏細工を使用してインテリアを作成することを選択したが、ペトは木製パネルを広範囲に使用したため、結果としてルシタニア号の全体的な印象はモーレタニア号のそれよりも明るくなった。ルシタニア号のデザインは、より人気があった。

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