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Currie separated the Canadian Corps' objectives into two phases; the first to take Canal du Nord and Bourlon Wood, the second taking the bridges at Canal de l'Escaut and "high ground near Cambrai". In an attempt to make the Germans second guess or question the location of the main assault, XXII Corps was instructed to engage German positions along the Canal du Nord between Sauchy-Lestrée and Palluel. Likewise, VII Corps and the remainder of XXII Corps were instructed to carry out minor attacks north of the Scarpe River to prevent the Germans from moving units from that area to the location of the main attack. If the Canadian Corps was successful in its advance the intention was to immediately and quickly exploit the territorial gain with the support of the British Third Army's XVII, VI and IV Corps. Battle Over the next week, Currie and Byng prepared for the engagement. Two divisions were sent south, to cross the canal at a weaker point, while Canadian combat engineers worked to construct the wooden bridges for the assault. The bridges were necessary because where the Canadians were crossing the Canal du Nord was flooded and the only locations that had no flooding were being guarded by the German defences. Currie had the Canadians cross mostly through flooded area, but included a "narrow strip" of unflooded area to hit the German flank. At 5:20 on the morning of September 27, all four divisions attacked under total darkness, taking the German defenders of the 1st Prussian Guards Reserve Division and the 3rd German Naval Division by absolute surprise. By mid morning, all defenders had retreated or been captured. Stiffening resistance east of the canal proved that only a surprise attack had the possibility of ending in victory. The Canadian Corps had the important objective of capturing Bourlon Woods, the German army used the high ground of the woods for their guns. The objectives of the Canadian Corps were reached by the end of the day, including the Red, Green and Blue lines. The British attack was supported to the south by the French First Army during the Battle of Saint Quentin (French: Bataille de Saint-Quentin). (However this attack was a secondary attack, and did not start until after the Canadian Corps had penetrated the German defenses along the canal.) Because of Canal du Nord's capture, the final road to Cambrai was open.

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>Currie separated the Canadian Corps' objectives into two phases; the first to take Canal du Nord and Bourlon Wood, the second taking the bridges at Canal de l'Escaut and "high ground near Cambrai". ⇒カリーは、カナダ軍団の標的(攻撃)を2つの段階に分けた。最初はカナル・デュ・ノールとブーロン・ウッドを奪取し、第2にはカナル・ド・レエスコーの橋を渡り、「カンブレ近くの高地」を奪取するものとした。 >In an attempt to make the Germans second guess or question the location of the main assault, XXII Corps was instructed to engage German positions along the Canal du Nord between Sauchy-Lestrée and Palluel. Likewise, VII Corps and the remainder of XXII Corps were instructed to carry out minor attacks north of the Scarpe River to prevent the Germans from moving units from that area to the location of the main attack. If the Canadian Corps was successful in its advance the intention was to immediately and quickly exploit the territorial gain with the support of the British Third Army's XVII, VI and IV Corps. ⇒ドイツ軍による主要襲撃の第二の場所を推測・検討する試みから、第XXII軍団はサウチ・レトレとパルエルの間のカナル・デュ・ノールに沿ってドイツ軍の陣地で交戦するよう指示された。同様に、第VII軍団、および第XXII軍団の残り部隊は、ドイツ軍がその地域から主要攻撃の場所に部隊を移すのを阻止するために、スカープ川の北に軽い攻撃を行うように指示された。もしもカナダ軍団の進軍が成功したら、彼らは直ちにかつ迅速に、英国第3方面軍の第XVII・第VI・第IV軍団の支援を受けて、領土獲得を試みることになった。 >Battle  Over the next week, Currie and Byng prepared for the engagement. Two divisions were sent south, to cross the canal at a weaker point, while Canadian combat engineers worked to construct the wooden bridges for the assault. The bridges were necessary because where the Canadians were crossing the Canal du Nord was flooded and the only locations that had no flooding were being guarded by the German defences. Currie had the Canadians cross mostly through flooded area, but included a "narrow strip" of unflooded area to hit the German flank. ⇒戦闘  カリーとビングは、次週の週間にわたって交戦の準備をした。カナダ軍の戦闘工兵が襲撃用の木製橋の建設作業をする一方で、より弱い地点で運河を横断するために2個師団が南に移動した。カナダ軍が横断していたところでノール川が氾濫し、洪水のない唯一の場所がドイツ軍の守備隊に守られていたため、橋梁が必要であった。カリーは、カナダ軍の大部分に水浸しの地域を横断させたが、ドイツ軍の側面に突撃するための非浸水地域の「狭い地峡」も含んでいた。 >At 5:20 on the morning of September 27, all four divisions attacked under total darkness, taking the German defenders of the 1st Prussian Guards Reserve Division and the 3rd German Naval Division by absolute surprise. By mid morning, all defenders had retreated or been captured. Stiffening resistance east of the canal proved that only a surprise attack had the possibility of ending in victory. ⇒9月27日午前5時20分、4個師団全員が真っ暗闇の中で攻撃をしかけて、プロイセン軍第1護衛予備師団とドイツ軍第3艦隊師団を完璧な急襲で捉えた。真夜中までに、すべての守備隊が退却したか、あるいは捕縛された。運河の東には堅固な抵抗隊が駐留しており、勝利で終局する可能性を見出すためには急襲攻撃によるほかない、ということが判明した。 >The Canadian Corps had the important objective of capturing Bourlon Woods, the German army used the high ground of the woods for their guns. The objectives of the Canadian Corps were reached by the end of the day, including the Red, Green and Blue lines.  The British attack was supported to the south by the French First Army during the Battle of Saint Quentin (French: Bataille de Saint-Quentin). (However this attack was a secondary attack, and did not start until after the Canadian Corps had penetrated the German defenses along the canal.) Because of Canal du Nord's capture, the final road to Cambrai was open. ⇒カナダ軍団にはブーロン・ウッドの攻略という重要な目的があったが、ドイツ方面軍はこの森林の高地部分を銃砲の(照準・狙撃の)ために利用していた。カナダ軍団は、赤・緑・青(図示部分)戦線の標的を含め、当日の終点部まで到達した。  英国軍の攻撃は、「サン=カンタン=カナルの戦い」(フランス語:Bataille de Saint-Quentin)の間、南側のフランス第1方面軍による支援を受けていた。(しかし、この攻撃は二次的な攻撃であり、カナダ軍団が運河に沿ってドイツ軍の防御地帯に侵入するまでは開始されなかった。)  カナル・デュ・ノールの攻略のために、カンブレへの最終的な道が開かれた。

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