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To assess the consequences of infantry having to advance across cratered ground after a mining attack, officers from the Canadian Corps visited La Boisselle and Fricourt where the mines had been blown on the First day of the Somme. Their reports and the experience of the Canadians at The Actions of St Eloi Craters in April 1916, where mines had so altered and damaged the landscape as to render occupation of the mine craters by the infantry all but impossible, led to the decision to remove offensive mining from the central sector allocated to the Canadian Corps at Vimy Ridge. Further British mines in the area were vetoed following the blowing by the Germans on 23 March 1917 of nine craters along no man's land as it was probable that the Germans were aiming to restrict an Allied attack to predictable points. The three mines already laid by 172nd Tunnelling Company were also dropped from the British plans. They were left in place after the assault and were only removed in the 1990s. Another mine, prepared by 176th Tunnelling Company against the German strongpoint known as the Pimple, was not completed in time for the attack. The gallery had been pushed silently through the clay, avoiding the sandy and chalky layers of the Vimy Ridge but by 9 April 1917 was still 21 metres (70 ft) short of its target.

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>To assess the consequences of infantry having to advance across cratered ground after a mining attack, officers from the Canadian Corps visited La Boisselle and Fricourt where the mines had been blown on the First day of the Somme. ⇒地雷攻撃の後のクレーターだらけの地面を横切って進軍しなければならない歩兵連隊の結果を評価するために、カナダ軍団から将校らが、ソンムの1日目に地雷が爆発したラ・ボアセーユとフリクールを訪問した。 >Their reports and the experience of the Canadians at The Actions of St Eloi Craters in April 1916, where mines had so altered and damaged the landscape as to render occupation of the mine craters by the infantry all but impossible, led to the decision to remove offensive mining from the central sector allocated to the Canadian Corps at Vimy Ridge. ⇒「サン・エロワ・クレーターの戦闘」跡では地雷のせいであまりに大きく風景が一変して損害を受けたので、歩兵連隊の手で地雷クレーターを占領することは不可能以外の何物でもなく、1916年4月そこを訪れたカナダ軍の報告と経験は、ヴィミー・リッジのカナダ軍団に割り当てられた中心地区から、攻撃の地雷を取り除くという決定につながった。 >Further British mines in the area were vetoed following the blowing by the Germans on 23 March 1917 of nine craters along no man's land as it was probable that the Germans were aiming to restrict an Allied attack to predictable points. The three mines already laid by 172nd Tunnelling Company were also dropped from the British plans. They were left in place after the assault and were only removed in the 1990s. ⇒英国軍がこの地域でさらに(敷設しようとした)地雷は拒否された。1917年3月23日、中間地帯に沿った9つのクレーターをドイツ軍が爆発させたので、ドイツ軍は連合国軍の攻撃を予測可能な点に制限しようと狙っている、と見てそれに従ったのである。第172トンネル掘削中隊によってすでに敷設されていた3つの地雷も、英国軍の計画から落とされた。それらは攻撃の後その場に残されて、ようやく1990年代に取り出された。 ※この段落はむずかしいです! かなり推測を交えて「異訳」しました。誤訳の可能性大です。あらかじめお詫びします! >Another mine, prepared by 176th Tunnelling Company against the German strongpoint known as the Pimple, was not completed in time for the attack. The gallery had been pushed silently through the clay, avoiding the sandy and chalky layers of the Vimy Ridge but by 9 April 1917 was still 21 metres (70 ft) short of its target. ⇒もう1つの地雷は、「ピンプル(突起物)」として知られるドイツ軍の防衛拠点に対して、第176トンネル掘削中隊によって準備されたものであるが、それは攻撃に間に合うように完成されなかった。横坑道がこっそりとヴィミー・リッジの砂地と白亜質層を避けて粘土層に通されていたが、1917年4月9日に目標までまだ21メートル(70フィート)不足していた。

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  • 英文を訳して下さい。

    From spring 1916, the British had deployed five tunnelling companies along the Vimy Ridge and during the first two months of their tenure of the area, 70 mines were fired, mostly by the Germans. Between October 1915 and April 1917 an estimated 150 French, British and German charges were fired in this 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) sector of the Western Front. In May 1916, Operation Schleswig-Holstein, a German infantry attack, forced the British back 640 metres (700 yd), to stop British mining by capturing the shaft entrances. From June 1916, the Germans withdrew many miners to work in coal mines in Germany. In the second half of 1916, the British constructed strong defensive underground positions and from August 1916, the Royal Engineers developed a mining scheme for a big infantry attack on the Vimy Ridge proposed for autumn 1916, although this was postponed. After September 1916, when the Royal Engineers had completed their network of defensive galleries along most of the front line, offensive mining largely ceased although activities continued until 1917. The British gallery network beneath Vimy Ridge eventually grew to a length of 12 kilometres (7.5 mi). The Canadian Corps was posted to the northern part of Vimy Ridge in October 1916 and preparations for an attack were revived in February 1917. British tunnelling companies created extensive underground networks and fortifications.

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  • 英文を日本語訳して下さい。

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