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The precedent of a German withdrawal to a prepared position followed by a counter-attack, which had occurred in 1914 was noted and that reserves freed by the retirement, would give the Germans an opportunity to attack the flanks of the withdrawal area. Nivelle had already decided to use the French troops released by the shorter front to reinforce the line in Champagne. British preparations for the attack at Arras were to proceed, with a watch kept for a possible German attack in Flanders and preparations for the attack on Messines Ridge were to continue. The pursuit of the German army was to be made in the Fourth Army area with advanced guards covered by the cavalry and cyclists attached to each corps and the 5th Cavalry Division. Larger forces were not to move east of a line from the Canal du Nord to the Somme south of Péronne until roads, bridges and railways had been repaired. The boundary of the Fourth Army and French Third Army was set from south of Nesle, through Offroy to St. Quentin.

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>The precedent of a German withdrawal to a prepared position followed by a counter-attack, which had occurred in 1914 was noted and that reserves freed by the retirement, would give the Germans an opportunity to attack the flanks of the withdrawal area. Nivelle had already decided to use the French troops released by the shorter front to reinforce the line in Champagne. British preparations for the attack at Arras were to proceed, with a watch kept for a possible German attack in Flanders and preparations for the attack on Messines Ridge were to continue. ⇒ドイツ軍が用意された陣地へ撤退してその後に反撃が続くという先例が1914年に起こったことや、撤退によって自由になった予備軍が、ドイツ軍をして撤退地域の側面攻撃をする機会を与えるのだろう、ということが知られていた。ニヴェーユは、シャンパーニュの戦線を補強するための短い前線によって解放されるフランス軍隊を利用することにすでに決めていた。アラスの攻撃に対する英国軍の準備は、フランドルにおいてありうるドイツ軍の攻撃のために見張りを続け、ムスィヌ・リッジへの攻撃に対する準備を継続することになっていた。 >The pursuit of the German army was to be made in the Fourth Army area with advanced guards covered by the cavalry and cyclists attached to each corps and the 5th Cavalry Division. Larger forces were not to move east of a line from the Canal du Nord to the Somme south of Péronne until roads, bridges and railways had been repaired. The boundary of the Fourth Army and French Third Army was set from south of Nesle, through Offroy to St. Quentin. ⇒ドイツ方面軍の追求は、先進の防衛隊のいる第4方面軍地域で、騎兵隊とサイクリスト隊によってカバーされることになっていた。より大規模な軍隊は、道、橋、鉄道が修理されるまで戦線東のノール(北)運河からペロンヌ南のソンムまでは動かないことになっていた。第4方面軍とフランス第3方面軍の境界線は、ネスルの南からオフロイを通ってサン・カンタンまでの間に設定されていた。

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